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Program

&

Conference Handbook

 

Program: Day 1—Tuesday 12 November 2013. 2

Program: Day 2—Wednesday 13 November 2013. 3

Program: Day 3—Thursday 14 November 2013. 4

Session Presentations: Day 1—12 November 2013. 5

Session Presentations: Day 2—13 November 2013. 9

Session Presentations: Day 3—14 November 2013. 15

 


Day 1—Tuesday 12 November 2013

07:30am

Session 1.1 Breakfast Session: Exhibition open and coffee available (SCAC Members in attendance)

9:00am

Session 1.2 Plenary Session: Opening Session

Welcome: Professor Michael Frater, Rector UNSW Canberra at ADFA and Dr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

Keynote Address: Dr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

10.00am

Morning Tea

10.30am

Session 1.3a Plenary Session: SIE Architecture

Keynote Address: Mr Daniel McCabe, Assistant Secretary Infrastructure Architecture, CIOG

11.30am

Session 1.3b Plenary Session: The Transformation Journey for Defence ICT

Keynote Address: AIRCDRE Nick Barneveld, Commander Defence Strategic Communications, CIOG and Mr Michael Lawrey, Executive Director, Defence Engagement, Telstra

12.30pm

Lunch

1.30pm

Session 1.4a

Update: Delivering Mission Productivity for the Future For Defence

(Mr Ger Daly, Accenture)

Session 1.5a TDL STREAM

Update: Tactical information Exchange Domain Update

(SQNLDR Paul Ashby, CIOG and Mr Graham King, TIED Capability Coordinator, VCDF)

Session 1.6a

Product Brief: Enable Secure Information Sharing—Right Data Right People Right Time

(Mr George Kamis; Raytheon Trusted Computer Solutions)

Session 1.7a

IEEE STREAM

Paper 1: A Flexible Cryptographic Infrastructure for High-security SDR-based Systems

Paper 2: Fractal Methods for the Representation and Analysis of Polymorphism in Malware

Session 1.8a

IEEE STREAM

Paper 1: Combat Management Systems: Predicting Performance Early in the Design Lifecycle

Paper 2: A New Methodology for the Identification of Operational Stress Points and Assessment of Technology Solutions

Session 1.9a

Product Brief: Small Form Factor Link 16—TACNET Tactical Radio (TTR)

(Mr James Osborn, Data Link Solutions)

2.30pm

Session 1.4b

Update: Every Defence Organisation is a Digital Organisation

(Mr Carl Ward, Accenture)

Session 1.5b TDL STREAM

Update: ADFTA MTN Update

(Mr James Meredith, Head Emerging Technology Group; SQNLDR Emily Frizell, ADFTA Senior Engineering Officer; and Mr Kym Fisher, Joint Interoperability Manager, ADFTA)

Session 1.6b

Product Brief: Impact of Higher Security Requirements on Mobile ICT

(Ms Silvia Grabacki, Motorola Solutions Australia)

Session 1.7b

IEEE STREAM

Paper 1: Wide-Band Feeds for Multi-band SATCOM and EW Antennas

Session 1.8b

IEEE STREAM

Paper 1: A Rule-Based Platform for Distributed Real-Time SOA with Application in Defence Systems

Paper 2: Modelling Scenarios for the Performance Prediction of Distributed Real-time Embedded Systems

Session 1.9b

Update: Mission Focused IT

(Mr Paul Chase, Lockheed Martin)

INDUSTRY STREAM

Paper 2: Sharing Data over Challenging Military Networks

3.30pm

4.00pm

Session 1.4c

Update: Improving Readiness in the Area of Operations

(Mr David Lincourt & Ms Brenda Banning, SAP)

Session 1.5c TDL STREAM

Update: MTN Industry System Solution Capability Updates

(Mr Mike Kocin, Viasat; and Mr Todd Bardell, BAE Systems)

Session 1.6c

Update: Protect What Matters

(RADM(Retd) Elizabeth Hight, HP)

Session 1.7c

Update: Cost-effective Use of Cryptographic Principles to Secure National Scale Critical Infrastructure

(Mr Oliver Tonge, Ultra Electronics)

Session 1.8c

Tutorial: Link 22 Integration Needs Overview

(Mr Jason Longdon, Lockheed Martin Australia)

Session 1.9c

Product Brief: High Throughput, Where You Want It, When You Want It!

(Mr D'Ambrosio, O3b Networks)

5.00pm

to 6:30pm

Welcome Networking Drinks (CCEB principals and members in attendance)

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 6:30pm (open to free exhibition-only registration from 1:30pm to 4:30pm)

TDL Stream supported by TIE IO and the IDLS Society / IEEE Stream (Refereed papers) co-sponsored by IEEE

 


Day 2—Wednesday 13 November 2013

07:30am

Session 2.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: Thuraya: The New Wave of Mobile Satellite Services for Secure Voice and Data
Mr Dion Castle, Pivotel Satellite Government Services & Mr David Moss, Thuraya Director Government Services

9.00am

Session 2.2 Plenary Session: Coalition J6 Session

Keynote Address: MAJGEN Mike Milford, CTO, CIOG

Keynote Address: (GBR) AVM Phil Osborn

Keynote Address: (CAN) MAJGEN David Neasmith

Keynote Address: (NZL) Mr Victor Vae’au, CIO NZDF

Q & A panel

10.45am

Morning Tea

11.15am

Session 2.3a Plenary Session: Capability Developments

Keynote Address: AVM Neil Hart, JCC

Keynote Address: VADM Peter Jones, CDG

12.30pm

Lunch Session 2.3b Lunch Session Product Brief: Who’s Watching Your Network?: Effective Strategies for Targeted Attacks
Mr Sean Duca, Enterprise Solutions Architect, McAfee Australia & New Zealand

1.30pm

Session 2.4a

Update: C4ISR Applications in Military Environments

(Mr Ali Zarkesh, Vislink)

Session 2.5a TDL STREAM

Update: ADFTA Ground Network (GN) Capability Assurance Service

(Mr Josh Roth, ADFTA and Mr Mark Rattigan, ADFTA)

Session 2.6a

Product Brief: Berkeley IT: Using Secure SharePoint to deliver the Single Information Environment

(Mr Mark Naglost, Berkeley IT)

Session 2.7a

Update: The Human Factors In SATCOM (RF) Interference: Creating More Effective Mitigation Teams

(Dr Rob Rideout, SAT Corporation)

Session 2.8a

Product Brief: Wi-Fi for Classified and High-Security Environments

(Mr Donald Meyer, Aruba Networks)

Session 2.9a

Tutorial:

Software Defined Radios—Key Enablers For Network Centric Operations

(Mr Robert Traeger, Rohde & Schwarz)

2.30pm

Session 2.4b

Tutorial: Facilitating IT Collaboration from Edge to the Core for Military Advantage

(Mr David Triston-Rattay & Mr Greg Gardner, NetApp)

Session 2.5b TDL STREAM

Update: Land Network Integration Centre (LNIC) Update

(Mr Adam Mead, Army HQ LNIC)

Session 2.6b

Product Brief: The L-TAC Solution – Providing UHF MILSAT Com via Inmarsat

(Mr Mr Todd McDonell, Inmarsat)

Session 2.7b

Update: New Technologies for RF Interference Mitigation (Noise Cancelling Headphones for Your RF Modems)

(Mr Stuart Daughtridge, Kratos & Mr Bob Potter, SAT Corporation)

Session 2.8b

Product Brief: Deploying SharePoint into Geographically Distributed Environments

(Mr James Milne, Myriad Technologies)

3.30pm

Afternoon Tea

4.00pm to 5:00pm

Session 2.4c

Update: Supporting Optimum Defence Operations with ehealth

(Mr Leigh Donoghue, Accenture)

Session 2.5c TDL STREAM

Update: Land / GN Industry System Solution Capability Updates

(Mr Alan Callahan, Harris Software Systems; Mr Wade Hughes, Raytheon Australia; and Mr Matt Taylor, L-3 Communications Australia)

Session 2.6c

Product Brief: Mesh Networking at the Tactical Edge

(Mr Jimi Henderson, Silvus Technologies)

Session 2.7c

Update: Delivering Programs On Time, Budget And Specification

(Ms Jessica White, Dassault Systemes Australia Pty Ltd

Session 2.8c

Tutorial: Collaboration in the Field

Mr James Milne, Myriad Technologies)

Session 2.9c

Product Brief: Arming the Department of Defence with Information Intelligence

(Mr Francesco Millazzo, Dassault Systemes Australia Pty Ltd)

7.00pm–11.00pm

Conference Dinner (7:00pm for 7:30pm)

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 5:00pm (open to free exhibition-only registration from 1:30pm to 5:00pm)

 


Day 3—Thursday 14 November 2013

07:30am

Session 3.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: Laying the Foundations of Big Data Solutions
Mr Andrew McGee, Presales Director, Hitachi Data Systems

9.00am

Session 3.2 Plenary Session: Navy, Army, Air Force CIS Interoperability

Moderator: GPCAPT Darren May, Director Military Engagement (DME)

Keynote Address: CMDR David Prentice, Director General Navy Communications and Information Warfare

Keynote Address: COL Shaun Love, Director Network Enabled Warfare, Army

Keynote Address: WGCDR Daniel McManus, Deputy Director CIS, Air Force

10.30am

Morning Tea

11.00am

Session 3.3 Plenary Session: The Future of Threat Intelligence: How Threat Operations on the Internet Reveals Fascinating Things

Keynote Address: Mr John N. Stewart, Senior Vice President and Chief Security Officer, Cisco

12.30pm

Lunch

1.45pm

Session 3.4a

Update: Understanding the Foundational Elements Underpinning the Development of Good Cyber Resilient Practices

(Mr Gary Hale, Cisco)

Session 3.5a TDL STREAM

Tutorial: Executive Overview of MIDS Link 16 Tutorial

(Mr Patrick Pierson, Director Network Centric Solutions)

Session 3.6a

Tutorial:

A Workshop on Interference Suppression on Fixed and Mobile Platforms

(Dr Steve Nightingale, Cobham Technical Services)

Session 3.7a

Update: ADF Common Data Link Management and International Advancements

(Mr Gerry Kawamura, L-3 Communications)

Session 3.8a

Update: RPDE Update

(Mr Ken Snell, RPDE Engagement Manager & Colonel Sheldon Kidd, Director Joint Force Integration, CDG)

Session 3.9a SERVICES AND APPLICATIONS STREAM

Paper 1: Information Exchange within Modern Services and Applications

(Mr Brad Tobin, DSTO)

Paper 2: The Move Beyond Data Links

(Dr Philip Cutler & Dr Christos Sioutis, DSTO)

2.45pm

Session 3.4b

Update: Network Cyber Security - Defend, Discover, Remediate

(Mr Matt Carling, Cisco)

Session 3.5b TDL STREAM

Tutorial: MIDS Link 16 and JREAP Tutorial

(Mr Patrick Pierson, Director Network Centric Solutions)

Session 3.7b

Update: Evaluation for Enhanced Broadcast and Ship-to-Shore Solutions

(Mr Radek Novak, Rohde & Schwarz)

Session 3.8b

Update: The Potential for 3D Printing in the ADF

(LT Jacob Choi, Army School of Ordnance)

Session 3.9b SERVICES AND APPLICATIONS STREAM

Paper 3: Architecting Composite Component Systems for Heterogeneous Environments with Open Standard

(Mr Derek Dominish, DSTO)

Paper 4: Assurance of Distributed Systems

(Dr R.J. O'Dowd and Mr M.J. Davies, DSTO)

3.45pm

Afternoon Tea

4.15pm to 5:15pm

Session 3.4c

Update: The Narrowing Air Gap: Cyber Warfare in the Tactical Domain

(LCDR Gideon Creech, UNSW Canberra)

Session 3.5c TDL STREAM

Update: MIDS Link 16 Terminal Variants Modernisation and Developments

(Mr Patrick Pierson, Director Network Centric Solutions)

Tutorial (continued):

A Workshop on Interference Suppression on Fixed and Mobile Platforms

(Dr Steve Nightingale, Cobham Technical Services)

Session 3.7c

Update: TACPOD and the Tyranny of Distance

(Mr Ray Munoz & Mr Tom Ratliff, Ultra Electronics Advanced Tactical Systems)

Session 3.8c

Update: Radiofrequency Spectrum Management with Spectrum XXI Software

(Mr Ian Layzell, CIOG)

Session 3.9c

Product Brief: Tactical Data Links Over Copper (DON10)—Simple and Effective Alternative to Fibre-Optics

(Mr Alec Umansky, Defence Communications Industry)

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 1:30pm (NO free exhibition-only registrations available)

 


MILCIS2013

Session Presentations

 

Session Presentations: Day 1—12 November 2013

 

1.1 Breakfast Session

The Exhibition is open and coffee is available in the Exhibition Hall.

 

1.2 Plenary Session—Opening Session

Welcome: Professor Michael Frater, Rector, UNSW Canberra at ADFA and
Dr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

Keynote Address: Dr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

 

1.3a Plenary Session: SIE Architecture

Keynote Address: Mr Daniel McCabe, Assistant Secretary Infrastructure Architecture, CIOG

 

1.3b Plenary Session: The Transformation Journey for Defence ICT

Keynote Address: AIRCDRE Nick Barneveld, Commander Defence Strategic Communications, CIOG and
Mr Michael Lawrey, Executive Director, Defence Engagement, Telstra

Telstra and Australia’s Department of Defence are partnering to transform one of the largest ICT environments in Australia – a three-year challenge with the aim of delivering technology that can become the backbone of Defence for the next decade and beyond.

Join us to explore:

  • How the carrier grade solution is tailored to meet the Department’s business and war fighter communication needs, including greater productivity and cost efficiencies
  • What to expect over the evolution of this large-scale transformation
  • How the new ICT environment will provide Defence with flexibility as operational and war fighting requirements change
  • Bringing to life the new environment as you discover the potential to drive greater collaboration with your people.

 

1.4a Update: Delivering Mission Productivity for the Future for Defence

Presenter: Mr Ger Daly, Global Managing Director, Defence & Public Safety, Accenture Ireland

 

Achieving more with less is a consistent and critical mantra for the Australian Department of Defence and its counterparts worldwide. The challenge of delivering better operational outcomes for the warfighter with tighter budgets is set to increase as missions become more expensive and the world becomes more digitally connected.

This future-focused session will explore how defence organisations, like all public sector organisations, need to evolve to become more efficient and effective. To deliver effective public service for the future, fundamental shifts must now be considered and put into action. The session will focus on two key changes: the shift from being reactive to insight-driven, and the increasing use of these insights to manage costs and lift mission productivity.

Forward-thinking defence agencies are beginning to embrace these shifts but change must continue. For instance, defence organisations are increasingly using data and analytics to streamline logistics on a tactical level by improving demand forecasting and minimising inventory stockpiles. On a more strategic level, defence organisations are embracing predictive analytics to reduce risk and drive productivity gains in areas such as prediction and avoidance of equipment failures.

The session will feature analysis and discussion of practical examples from defence and other public sector agencies around the world. These will include insight from the defence logistics rationalisation underway in Northern Europe, a visionary pensions solutions from Norway as well as the large United States Defense Logistics Agency’s transformational program which helped the US DOD cut costs from 24.7% to 14% in a decade, while growing services by 70%.

 

1.4b Update: Every Defence Organisation is a Digital Organisation

Presenter: Mr Carl Ward, Managing Director, Technology Lead Health & Public Service, Accenture

 

Mobile networks, convergence, cloud, social media, analytics, virtualisation. Technology moves at a rapid pace, and is hence becoming more relevant in Australian Defence operations and around the globe. Of these emerging technologies, how many of the latest advances can be effective and applicable for defence? Which new trends are the right ones to adopt? Are they secure or scalable enough to deploy?

This session will focus on the concept that every business is now transforming to become a digital business and this is true for defence. The speaker will draw on the trends called out in the Accenture Technology Vision 2013 which forward thinking government agencies and private organisations are harnessing to fast track productivity gains, become more agile, drive collaboration and manage budget constraints.

Some of these trends are no longer new, but the thinking around how to put these technologies to work to create nimble, cost-effective solutions is particularly thought-provoking for defence. It’s about a new digitally-savvy mindset around the application and execution of these technologies as enablers for better business outcomes.

The session will explore and discuss:

·         Design for analytics accessing the right data from the right sources.

·         Data velocity matching the speed of decision making to the speed of action.

·         Seamless collaboration embedding collaboration into business processes.

·         Software-defined networking an agile way to unleash the power of virtualisation.

·         Active defence managing IT security breaches will be about staying flexible, adaptable and a step ahead.

·         Beyond the cloud putting the cloud to work as an on-demand, elastic technology.

 

1.4c Update: Improving Readiness in the Area of Operations

Presenters: Mr David Lincourt & Ms Brenda Banning, SAP

 

Explore the benefits and hindrances of integrating Command and Control (C2) and Enterprise Resource Planning systems. Proponents hypothesize that integration will improve the effectiveness of the warfighter through closer coupling of the maintenance and supply processes with battlespace events; while opponents hypothesize the burden imposed by the integration will detract from the mission at hand. This presentation looks at considerations related to people, processes and technology to determine the right time to inject integration to improve logistics performance to the foxhole without burdening the soldier in the field.

 

1.5a Update: Tactical information Exchange Domain Update

Presenter: SQNLDR Paul Ashby, SO2 TIED - TIED Project Realisation Manager, CIOG CICTCC; and Mr Graham King, TIED Capability Coordinator, VCDF

 

The Tactical Information Exchange Domain (TIED) supports the seamless flow of tactical information across the different radio-frequencies (RF) and fixed infrastructure to interconnect weapon systems, major sensor systems and platforms, C2 systems and Headquarters to produce a Common Tactical Picture (CTP).

Directorate of ICT Capability Coordination (DICTCC), is responsible for the capability coordination of Specialist Communications such as Satellite Communications (SATCOM), Tactical Information Exchange Domain (TIED), High Grade Cryptographic Equipment (HGCE), Deployed Networks and Applications (DNApps), Command and Control (C2) Systems, Demonstration and Experimentation, and Combined Federated Battle Lab Network (CFBLNet). DICTCC is the TIE Domain Project Realisation Manager responsible for defining the rollout of new projects and sustaining the capability.

VCDF is the Joint Capability Authority (JCA) responsible for the TIED capability coordination and ensuring joint new and extant capabilities are developed in accordance with joint concepts and doctrine, appointing capability managers for delivering joint capabilities, and providing conceptual basis the future joint force and integration of its capabilities. VCDF has a number of plans to modify the scope of the TIED to better interface with the operational needs. This work will see the development of the Battlespace Information Exchange Environment and create an integrated Joint Data Network (JDN).

Throughout 2013, the CIOG, VCDG and Battlespace Information Exchange (BIE) Working Group members have formalised the new Governance arrangements, provided more direction on the realisation of Joint Project 2089 – Phase 2A Initials Common Support Infrastructure and Joint Interface Control capabilities, updated the concept for Multi TDL Network Joint Interface Control operations, realigned TIED functional support arrangements and developed a plan to develop a TIED Capability Support Plan.

This brief aims to provide an overview of the TIED and provide specific details on the achievements for the year and outline details of the activities planned for 2014.

 

1.5b Update: ADFTA MTN Update

Presenter: Mr James Meredith, Head Emerging Technology Group, SQNLDR Emily Frizell, ADFTA Senior Engineering Officer (SENGO) and Mr Kym Fisher, Joint Interoperability Manager, ADFTA

 

The primary role of ADFTA is to ensure correct TDL functionality at the platform level to achieve Joint and Combined TDL interoperability in accordance with Defence policies. The ADFTA is the ADF’s centre of expertise for the TIE Domain, it provides TDL message implementation and interoperability capability assurance services through the provision of development advice and configuration management of TDL standards. The ADFTA also provides Joint (platform non-specific) Joint MTN training from executive overviews to delivery of the Joint Interface Control Officer (JICO) training.

This brief aims to provide an update on these activities, provide insight into the recent trials and activities and outline plans for the future.

During 2013, the ADFTA TDL training Cell has continued to evolve and updated its range of TDL training services, and changed the way how it delivers some of the training. This brief will provide an update on the achievements, details how Joint TDL training will be delivered into the future, and provide details of activities and services planned for 2014.

The ADFTA Emerging Technology cell has established an Australian Link 22 Trials Suite to conduct a series of trials, evaluation and demonstrations to conduct risk mitigation activities. This brief will provide insight into the configuration of the Australian Link 22 Trials Suite, highlight the achievements and issues observed, and outline the future plans.

Mr Kym Fisher will provide an update on the interoperability assurance support services provided to services to ADF Projects and in platform capability managers for in-service TDL systems. This brief will provide an update on the TIED Capability Assurance activities and high-light issues associated with interoperability planning, and plans.

 

1.5c Update: MTN Industry System Solution Capability Updates

Presenter: Mr Mike Kocin, Viasat; and Mr Todd Bardell, BAE Systems

These briefs aim to provide a brief overview of the key system solutions fielded within the TIED, high-light development plans and cover sustainment plans or considerations.

Mr Jim Hardie, Managing Director Mitso Consulting will provide an overview of the Link 11 Data Terminal Set (DTS) capability, outline details of the sustainment challenges of sustaining the fleet of DTSs across Australia, and outline how theses DTSs could be used to sustain Link 11 and also provide a growth path to transition to Link 22.

Mr Mike Kocin, ViaSat Director of International Programs will provide an update on MIDS LVTs, MIDS JTRS upgrades and support, and also provide details of support tools available to troubleshoot and sustain these terminals. This brief will also provide insight into the Link 16 Small Tactical Terminal, which could be used on small vessels and light aircraft that have space, weight and power constraints.

Mr Todd Bardell, Business Development Manager BAE Systems will provide an update on Joint Tactical Information Distribution System (JTIDS) and Multi Information Distribution System (MIDS) Low Volume Terminal (LVT) developments and sustainment, and will also provide details on the new MIDS Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) variant.

 

1.6a Product Brief: Enable Secure Information Sharing – Right Data Right People Right Time

Presenter: Mr George Kamis, Chief Technology Officer, Raytheon Trusted Computer Solutions

 

Facilitating data sharing between entities not typically accustomed to sharing is critical; however, it must be done in a manner that equally protects sensitive and personal information. With the increasing need to access data from many devices, locations and sources, the need to know what the data is, where it should be stored, and the rules governing its access are of paramount importance.

Cyber and physical threats come from worldwide sources, including government and independently sponsored threat agents, requiring domestic and global responses. Recent announcements of public and private information sharing initiatives, governments and industries are realizing that no one entity can handle all of this data.

Information sharing solutions are built with strict security controls to ensure that the right data is shared with the right people and across systems to efficiently and effectively protect personal and public interests. Three solution types fall under this umbrella. Access solutions provide a path to data on different networks (enclaves, domains) regardless of device. Trusted Thin Client® provides secure simultaneous access to multiple networks from a single device. Transfer solutions provide mechanisms to securely move data between networks and mitigate against viruses, malware, and policy violations. High Speed Guard provides rapid, flexible and secure transfer of structured and unstructured data; and Trusted Gateway System™ provides a workflow tool to securely transfer files. Hybrid solutions encompass both access and transfer. WebShield allows enterprises to leave data on any given network, allowing for secure search and retrieval of data regardless of the resident network security level.

Just as there are endless types and sources of data, there are a plethora of ideas on how to handle that data and address security concerns. Raytheon Trusted Computer Solutions has provided military-grade security solutions for over a decade— providing the right data to the right people at the right time; from anywhere.

The High Speed Guard (HSG) cross domain information sharing solution is NOT approved for export beyond the Five-Eyes partners.

 

1.6b Impact of Higher Security Requirements on Mobile ICT

Presenter: Ms Silvia Grabacki, Marketing Executive, Motorola Solutions Australia

 

From smartphones to tablets, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) mobile devices provide the Military and government IT users with an unprecedented opportunity to capitalize on advanced mobile computing and communications. The rapid proliferation of COTS technology means voice and data is available to agencies anytime, anywhere.

How do organizations adopt these new technologies and adhere to existing security policies and requirements?

Commercial devices don’t have the capability to meet the Federal government’s minimum security requirements for protecting personal, military and enterprise voice and data. Now more than ever, it is critical to augment commercial communication systems with solutions that ensure security and confidentiality.

Designed specifically for tactical users, AME 2000 is a secure mobile voice and data solution. It delivers high-assurance security using hardware cryptography and key storage, IPsec VPN, Data at Rest (DAR), VoIP application, as well as device and key management. The solution enables users to leverage a commercially available Android handheld while anchoring security in a hardware crypto-security module. Completely standards-based, this security solution meets industry requirements and is interoperable with existing enterprise infrastructure systems, such as VPNs and mobile device management solutions.

Motorola Solutions has a strong 40 year heritage in delivering leading public safety solutions in Australia. Today, Motorola Solutions is well positioned to provide mission critical solutions, devices and applications that meet the specific needs of military personnel.

 

1.6c Update: Protect What Matters

Presenter: RADM (Redt) Elizabeth Hight, HP

 

RADM (Redt) Betsy Hight will address the following issues:

  • Managing Risk: Today’s Challenges
  • Advanced Persistent Threat
  • What was our response yesterday?
  • What is our response today?
  • What is the next level of response?
  • Operationalising the Cyberspace domain
  • A maturity model for Cyberspace operations
  • Adopt a security intelligence platform
  • Network defence and intrusion prevention
  • The Risk Agenda

o   Disruptive Technology

o   It’s more than hardware and software

 

1.7a Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream

 

Paper 1: A Flexible Cryptographic Infrastructure for High-security SDR-based Systems

Authors: Peter Hillmann and Björn Stelte, Universität der Bundeswehr München

 

Abstract. Military software defined radio (SDR) systems are a major factor in future network-centric operations due to their flexibility and support for more capable radio communications systems. The inherent nature of software-based systems necessitates a more complex auxiliary infrastructure and multiple independent levels of security compared with typical systems: Secure booting of the SDR device, cryptographically signed software, real time operating platform software as well as radio applications, and enforcement of information assurance policies. This technology raises new defiance with respect to the management. The largest impact on SDR deployments is due to the auxiliary cryptographic infrastructure necessary for the security of the software life cycle and the cyclic update of the keys. Compared to the conventional radio devices, the SDR system with the cryptographic infrastructure described in this paper reaches a higher security level and more flexibility. The advantage is the possibility to deploy trunked radio system and further waveforms, like coalition wideband, which will be standardized in the future. It is also possible to update cryptographic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the requirements for a high secure SDR deployment and model the life cycle of the components of a deployed SDR node based on the Joint Program Executive Office (JPEO) Software Communication Architecture (SCA).

 

Paper 2: Fractal Methods for the Representation and Analysis of Polymorphism in Malware

Authors: Ben Cowen Department of Defence and Kamran Shafi, The University of New South Wales, Canberra

 

Abstract. The preponderance of network resident cyber threats are due to zero day vulnerabilities or unpatched systems. Traditional signature based detection methods are ineffective against such threats, and anomaly detection methods are typically computationally intensive. By treating polymorphism as a stochastic process and applying fractal visualization methods, identifying features can be found. These features are suited to then be used for detection with algorithms such as Bayes classifiers.

 

1.7b Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream

 

Paper 1: Wide-Band Feeds for Multi-band SATCOM and EW Antennas

Authors: C. Granet, J.S. Kot, I.M. Davis, G.S. Pope, BAE Systems Australia, TBA

 

Abstract. New requirements for wide band operation in areas such as SATCOM, EW, and radio astronomy are stretching the capability of traditional horn antenna designs. New horn types are being developed to meet these requirements. Two examples are presented: the smooth-walled profiled horn and the “bullet” horn.

 

Refereed Papers—Industry Stream

 

Paper 2: Sharing Data over Challenging Military Networks

Authors: Lawrence Poynter and Philip Wilcocks, iOra

 

Abstract. This paper describes the challenges for sharing data in deployed environments and how they are then complicated by the performance of the available military networks in ensuring a consistent and holistic view of data. To mitigate the effect of reduced or unavailable network resources this paper then describes a series of strategies that support information sharing and collaboration.

 

1.7c Update: Cost-effective Use of Cryptographic Principles to Secure National Scale Critical Infrastructure

Presenter: Mr Oliver Tonge, Senior Consultant, Ultra Electronics AEP Networks

 

On one hand Critical National Infrastructure (CNI) requires communications, while on the other these requisite channels can be exploited for cyber-attacks. At national scales the management of these communities is complicated by the classification of material, resulting in multi-dimensional disproportionally expensive network management infrastructure, using varieties of incompatible tools in discrete silos.

Oliver Tonge will explore how today’s technologies and cryptographic principles can be assembled to provide a national scale complete key management and secured communications infrastructure that enables multi-tier secured and segregated communications via a fully centralised management system, without incurring the costs normally associated with such deployments.

 

1.8a Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream

 

Paper 1: Combat Management Systems: Predicting Performance Early in the Design Lifecycle

Authors: Matthew Britton, Katrina Falkner, The University of Adelaide, and Gavin Puddy, Defence Science and Technology Organisation

 

Abstract. In this paper we show how designs of COTS-based real-time systems, such as Naval combat management systems, can be realistically analysed early in their design lifecycle using the technique of executable modelling, potentially identifying problems earlier in the design lifecycle than by using traditional design methodologies, with resultant cost and time savings. Our emphasis is on verifying performance through-life as components change, and in the initial design where military off-the-shelf components may be used in a platform with different capabilities than originally intended.

 

Paper 2: A New Methodology for the Identification of Operational Stress Points and Assessment of Technology Solutions

Authors: Matthew Britton, Michael Webb, Sanjeev Naguleswaran, The University of Adelaide

 

Abstract. Military operations place demands on command support systems and communications infrastructure that vary according to phase of the operation. We present here a new methodology for the analysis of operational architecture products that enables the ready identification of stress points in the command, control and communications (C3) systems supporting operations. We then combine this with a comprehensive technology assessment framework, where we seek to match specific technologies against the specific Information Exchange Requirements (IER) at the identified C3 stress points. In addition to specific information and communications requirements, the assessment framework also considers a range of factors critical to the successful uptake of new technologies into existing contexts. These factors include technology type, scope of applicability, technology maturity, operational impact and architectural and organisational match.

 

1.8b Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream

 

Paper 1: A Rule-Based Platform for Distributed Real-Time SOA with Application in Defence Systems

Authors: Alexander Cameron, Markus Stumptner, Nanda Nandagopal, Wolfgang Mayer, University of South Australia and Todd Mansell, Defence Science and Technology Organisation

 

Abstract. We propose a novel method of addressing some key inhibiters to the application of distributed Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) involving real-time systems. We consider the need to decentralise workflow as central to the success of SOA and introduce an attribute driven SOA model that also provides a framework within which to analyse and build systems that have deterministic behaviour. The proposed Process Container provides a generic framework for the hosting of services and their contribution to a decentralised process. A significant benefit of this architecture is that it lends itself to greater analysis resulting in tighter performance bounds when considering verification and validation aspects. We present a benchmark performance assessment of the architecture and simulation of the proposed architecture in a naval combat system context.

 

Paper 2: Modelling Scenarios for the Performance Prediction of Distributed Real-time Embedded Systems

Authors: Katrina Falkner, Vanea Chipriannov, Nickolas Kalkner, Claudia Szabo, The University of Adelaide, Gavin Puddy, Defence Science and Technology Organisation

 

Abstract. Autonomous defence systems are typically characterized by hard constraints on space, weight and power. These constraints have a strong impact on the non-functional properties and especially performance of the final system. System execution modelling tools permit early prediction of the performance of model driven systems; however they are intended for one shot analysis, not for repeatable, interactive use. In this paper we propose a Domain Specific Language for describing scenarios to repeatedly test a system execution model within a Synthetic Environment. We exemplify it by describing and executing a scenario involving an UAV and a CMS.

 

1.8c Tutorial: Link 22 Integration Needs Overview

Presenter: Mr Jason Longdon, IS&GS National, Lockheed Martin Australia.

 

The analysis of Beyond Line Of Sight (BLOS) for the ADF has included the traditional satellite communications paths and the next generation of the currently implemented Tactical Data Links (TDLs). Link 22 is the replacement for the existing Link 11 capability, offering improved functionalities, a BLOS capability and is designed to complement and interoperate easily with the Link 16 TDL capability.

This presentation will be an update to that of MILCIS 2011 and will take a different approach from the usual Introduction tutorials, by identifying the Link 22 TDL as an enabling capability to achieve operational functions through its integration with combat capabilities, rather than just internal technical operation.

Introduction

Link 22 Operational Context Background – CONOPS Review

Link 22 Subsystem Overview – Function not technical internals (What, not how)

Link 22 Subsystem Integration within Host and Support Environments - Options

Link 22 Integration Activities

o From Needs to Testing

o Supporting Tools and Processes

Link 22 Generic Issues

o SNC Acquisition

o NILE PMO CM

o Cryptographic Equipment

Link 22 Extant Products – Listing against Subsystem integration, not a detailed description of products, a grouping for the audience.

Link 22 CIWG Advert

ADF future tactical communication operational environment

Questions

Upon completion of this tutorial the audience will be aware of the equipment and capabilities of Link 22, how it fits within the ADF future tactical data communication domain and the methods to ensure a successful integration.

 

1.9a Update: Small Form Factor Link 16—TacNet Tactical Radio (TTR)

Presenter: Mr James Osborn, Data Link Solutions

 

The Rockwell Collins TacNet Tactical Radio (TTR) delivers proven Link 16 capability to meet both U.S. armed forces and coalition warfighter requirements for a small, lightweight, low-cost Link 16 situational awareness radio to combat 21st century threats. TTR is the smallest size, standalone Link 16 terminal available today.

Built on a solid foundation of combat-proven data link systems, the Rockwell Collins TacNet Tactical Radio provides critical connectivity for platforms that traditionally lacked Link 16 access, such as UAS, Tactical Air Control Party (TACP), mobile and transportable ground stations, rotary wing, small maritime assets, and transport aircraft.

 

1.9b Update: Mission Focused IT

Presenter: Mr Paul Chase, Lockheed Martin

 

With today’s cost pressures driving many Defence Acquisition decisions, Mission requirements are competing with commercial practices and cost efficiencies. Mission Focused ICT is a presentation that shows how both goals of improving mission effectiveness and leveraging the commercial best practices can be achieved. Within this presentation we will provide case studies of where this approach has been used to successfully to improve mission capabilities and provide strategic recommendations on how this can achieved with in the Australian Defence Forces.

 

1.9c Product Brief: High Throughput, Where You Want It, When You Want It!

Presenter: Mr D’Ambrosio, O3b Networks

 

O3b Networks offers users High Throughput Satellites (HTS) with speeds up to 1.2GBPS, and O3b satellites have only steerable beams. Thus, beams can be put where the customer wants them and adjusted constantly to where the customer wants or needs connectivity. This Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) constellation has four satellites currently in orbit with the second four to launch in Q1 of 2014, which will complete the constellation as well as all in orbit testing (IOT) and will commence commercial service by Q2 2014. O3b global service has gateways around the world directly connected to fiber. Two of O3b Network gateways are located in Australia. O3b has been working with the U.S Department of Defense (DoD) and its telecommunications agency, Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), who provides, operates, and assures command and control, information sharing capabilities, and a globally accessible enterprise information infrastructure in direct support to joint Warfighters, National level leaders, and other mission and coalition partners across the full spectrum of operations. O3b Networks is applying capabilities to its gateways and network to ensure secure handling of information that is determined to be vital to the operational readiness or mission effectiveness of deployed and contingency forces in terms of both content and timeliness. This same level of security will be applied to all USG alliances and partners. It is also working with commercial partners to provide broadband services where no fiber or affordable satellite services exist. Its satellite constellation offers higher throughput lower latency and more affordable then existing satellite services and is faster and less expensive to put into play than fiber.

 

Session Presentations: Day 2—13 November 2013

 

2.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: Thuraya: The New Wave of Mobile Satellite Services for Secure Voice and Data

Presenters: Mr Dion Castle, Pivotel Satellite Government Services &
Mr David Moss, Thuraya Director Government Services

 

A shift is taking place in Mobile Satellite Services technologies and Defence communication challenges will continue to drive innovation. Your operations count on satellite communications and place great emphasis on practical secure voice and data to maintain command and control. Pivotel and Thuraya will present and deliver insight on the evolution that is taking place for Secure Voice and Data solutions for Defence. Thuraya DefenseComms enables secure and reliable two-way communications in real time between HQ command and deployed units — with solutions that enable connectivity and interoperability to a wide range of communication platforms. Thuraya DefenseComms provides a highly-effective framework to coordinate all units in mission-critical scenarios, from infantry to land-based and air-based reconnaissance, and tactical groups. Technologies such as the Thuraya IP+, Satsleeve and a number of Defence specific technologies are real game changers. You will understand Thuraya’s and Pivotel’s Defence technology roadmap and the role these innovations can play in the future.

Dion Castle: Pivotel Satellite Government Services

Dion Castle serves as Pivotel’s Government and Defence Territory Manager drawing upon over nine years of experience working with complex telecommunications, network and satellite technologies. Dion’s responsibility is to ensure that Government and Defence customers in the region have access to Pivotel’s roadmap of innovative technologies and mobile satellite service capabilities. Dion oversees all Defence strategic planning and is also responsible for leading all customer program teams and co-ordinating government affairs activities.

David Moss: Thuraya Director Government Services

David Moss holds a Master’s degree from University College London in Telecommunications Engineering, and is experienced in providing reliable mission critical communications having served with the UK Ministry of Defence for over 20 years. After leaving the MoD David turned his MSc dissertation work into a product for his employer that was adopted by many of the world’s major navy’s for primary satellite communications including the US Navy, US Coast Guard, UK MoD, Dutch Navy, Australian Defence Force, Canadian Navy and the New Zealand Defence Force. David worked closely with all of these organisations leading the contract negotiations and service role out. David has now been with Thuraya for three years and looks after Government and Defence business development in Europe, The Middle East and Asia. During his time with Thuraya David has led several major initiatives including the implementation of the Netted Comms product and development of the Thuraya Aero solutions.

About Pivotel Satellite:

Pivotel Satellite provides Australia’s best Mobile Satellite Solutions for Voice and Data communications. Pivotel is an Australian owned and operated licensed mobile telecommunications carrier and for over 10 years has been an investor in satellite communications infrastructure. Pivotel is the largest single supplier of mobile satellite services in the region and provides end-to-end communications and connectivity to thousands of remote sites and personnel worldwide utilising capacity under regional connectivity agreements with Thuraya, Iridium and Globalstar. Pivotel provides capabilities that feature secure global data transfer and voice communications for on-the-move, over-the-horizon, beyond line-of-sight, communications. Pivotel operates in Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia and the Pacific. For more information visit www.pivotel.com.au

About Thuraya:

Thuraya Telecommunications Company is an industry leading MSS operator and a global telecommunication provider offering innovative communications solutions to a variety of sectors including energy, broadcast media, maritime, military and NGO. Thuraya’s superior network enables clear communications and uninterrupted coverage across two thirds of the globe. The company’s diverse range of technologically superior and highly reliable mobile satellite handsets and broadband devices provide ease of use, value, quality and efficiency. Thuraya remains committed to serving humanity through delivering the essential tools for optimal connectivity, never leaving anyone out of reach. For more information visit www.thuraya.com


 

2.2 Plenary Session: Coalition J6 Session

Keynote Address: MAJGEN Mike Milford, HICTO, CIOG

Keynote Address: (GBR) AVM Phil Osborn

Keynote Address: (CAN) MAJGEN David Neasmith

Keynote Address: (NZL) Mr Victor Vae’au, CIO NZDF

Q & A panel

 

2.3a Plenary Session: Capability Developments

Keynote Address: AVM Neil Hart, JCC

Keynote Address: VADM Peter Jones, CDG

 

2.3b Lunch Product Session: Who’s Watching Your Network?: Effective Strategies for Targeted Attacks

Presenter: Mr Michael Sentonas, Vice President, Chief Technology Officer, McAfee Asia Pacific &
Mr Sean Duca, Enterprise Solutions Architect, McAfee Australia & New Zealand

 

As cyber-attacks continue to impact governments, organisations and end-users around the globe, authorities and the media seem increasingly focused on determining who is responsible for these breaches. This misplaced attention on identifying the source – or the who – has seen many IT Security Managers fail to focus on understanding the breach – or the how. Recognising an attack that is underway, how it has occurred, how to stop it and how to make sure it doesn’t happen again is the key to ensuring a resilient architecture. In this session, Michael Sentonas will identify some of the key security challenges faced by organisations today and then provide practical approaches to anticipate and prevent cyber-attacks targeting your organisation.

 

2.4a Update: C4ISR Applications in Military Environments

Presenter: Mr Ali Zarkesh, Business Development Director - SatCom Solutions, Vislink

 

This paper discusses the growing use and importance of Command, Control, Communications, Computer Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) applications in military environments (from Persian Gulf War of 1991 to present day). The paper will aim to draw on the experience the writer has collated over the past twenty years at a range of IT and communications companies, culminating in his present position at Vislink which supplies a range of satellite, microwave, HF and cellular solutions for C&C communications.

Situation awareness and tactical decision making are critical elements in military environments and require accurate, detailed information from multiple sources at the required time. This can only be achieved by having multi layered solutions that provide a variety of technologies to portray information from multiple sources in theatre. The building blocks for these solutions include mobile and fixed satellite systems, microwave systems, wireless camera systems for close in surveillance, down links to communicate information from UAV and other aerial surveillance craft (with data from wireless cameras) and a central C&C hub (mobile or fixed) that will take all the collated information and pass onto the required operations centre so that decisions can be quickly made based on accurate and complete information.

This presentation will use a number of real-life case studies from military environments to study and analyse the use and critical importance of C4ISR communications in military environments and how this has developed in the past decade and is now at the centre piece of battlefield decision making.

 

2.4b Tutorial: Facilitating IT Collaboration from Edge to the Core for Military Advantage

Presenters: Mr David Triston-Rattay & Mr Greg Gardner, NetApp

 

The near-real-time sharing and collaboration of information collected from any source within the battlespace from the tactical edge to the core of CIOG systems and then coordinating a response to the total information collected is a challenge for militaries the world over. Current DMO projects are addressing some of the network and communications challenges but are not addressing data management issues. The challenge is greater given the changing data collection environment now includes HD video, huge amount of sensor data, imagery, and traditional data collection system. This presentation will define the challenge and provide some options for how network and communications needs more than bandwidth. It also requires new processes and procedures and a common standardised data management and replication platform.

 

2.4c Update: Supporting Optimum Defence Operations with ehealth

Presenter: Mr Leigh Donoghue, Managing Director, Australia Health, Accenture

 

Defence organisations use many of the world’s most advanced technology systems, yet when it comes to managing the health of its personnel, approaches are often manual, paper-based or siloed. In a possible scenario, a soldier is injured in theatre, quickly treated by a medic then transferred to a military hospital or treated elsewhere and so on. Information with respect to this solider, their treatments and pre-existing health may be hard to access, recorded in paper notes and at risk during transfers.

This session will discuss advances in connected health, electronic health records, health management and how they can be applied to the unique requirements of defence organisations. Electronic platforms make it possible to maintain a health record and history for an individual so medical staff can access it from any location. Tracking and analysing this information also enables insight into which personnel are fit for deployment, how to optimise fitness for deployment readiness and what hot spots or risk factors need to be addressed.

As the National Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR) continues to roll out across Australia, this session will explore opportunities for defence to leverage the power of this type of system or capability by drawing on Accenture s experience with health programs in Australia, Singapore, the United States and the United Kingdom, along with a key case study from the Spain Ministry of Defence. The session will also address the challenges to consider—what are the distinct needs of defence; does military information require extra sensitivity; how is information transferred?

 

2.5a Update: ADFTA Ground Network (GN) Capability Assurance Service

Presenter: Mr Josh Roth, ADFTA and Mark Rattigan, ADFTA

 

The primary role of ADFTA is to ensure correct TDL functionality at the platform level to achieve Joint and Combined TDL interoperability in accordance with Defence Instructions and Policies. ADFTA provides capability assurance services for new Ground Networks that are used to conduct Digitally-aided Close Air Support (DaCAS) tasks and Joint FIRES missions.

This brief will provide an information session on Ground Networks (GNs), an update on the ADF GN Implementation and interoperability requirements and issues, GN Test and Compliance activities, and outline plans for improving Joint interoperability for platforms and systems using Variable Message Format (VMF).

 

2.5b Update: Land Network Integration Centre (LNIC) Update

Presenter: Mr Adam Mead, Army HQ LNIC

 

The Land Network Integration Centre (LNIC) was established in 2010 with its role being to inform Army’s networking decisions and support the development of Army’s Land Network Capability. In order to achieve this, the LNIC delivers the following Land Network effects: Develop land network capability, manage land network capability, inform land network development, and Integrate and Support land network capability.

This brief will provide an overview of LNIC roles and activities, and will provide an update on the issues/challenges, initiatives and plans for supporting in-service Army network-centric operations.

Mr Mead will discuss Land TDL management and the role played by the LNIC from informing requirements through to service acceptance and in service support including Unit Reference Number (URN) management and how this is being achieved practically within the three services. He will also discuss current issues and likely future configuration control requirements for Army.

 

2.5c Update: Land / GN Industry System Solution Capability Updates

Presenter: Mr Alan Callahan, Business Development Manager, Harris Software Systems Pty Ltd; Mr Wade Hughes, Business Development Manager, Raytheon Australia Pty Ltd; and Mr Matt Taylor, Business Development Manager L-3 Communications Australia Pty Ltd

 

The transition of battlefield tactical communications from single channel, narrow band legacy waveforms to multiple, data centric waveforms and networks has been paramount in the success of users deployed in recent operations. With the enhancement to battlefield communications comes the additional challenge of militaries in supporting them once fielded with logistics, trade skills and networking knowledge. Mr Alan Callahan will provide details of the communications transition and challenges observed through Harris activities, a leading provider of tactical communications, where end user requirements have been a major design consideration in generating the FALCON III™ and Next Generation Product lines to meet the current and future needs of militaries; and how they are adjusting business to ensure assured communications support is also available.

The next generation telecommunications systems of the Battlefield Communications System (Land) BCS(L) provides the communications and information systems (CIS) infrastructure to all deployed forces operating in the land environment. Defence has fielded the Enhanced Position Location Reporting System (EPLRS), and the smaller Microlite dismounted radio system, as the next generation Tactical Data Distribution System. Mr Wade Hughes will provide details on the rollout, information on parameters to further exploit the effectiveness of this radio system, and outline details of planned developments.

Mr Matt Taylor will provide a CDL capability brief to highlight the capabilities of CDL systems including the direct data support and information transfer for both data; C2; and FMV between airborne nodes and ground based users. The briefing will high light the performance extensions that can occur as Link 16 and CDL systems are used in conjunction with each other for the benefit of warfighters.

 

2.6a Product Brief: Berkeley IT: Using Secure SharePoint to deliver the Single Information Environment

Presenter: Mr Mark Naglost, Managing Director, Berkeley IT

 

Operating in Defence since 1999, Berkeley IT has a unique understanding of secure IM requirements, environments and culture having delivered secure IM solutions on behalf of DMO and CIOG to more than 120 organisations within the ADO. We are dedicated to removing information “stovepipes” and providing secure information management and exchange between applications, dissimilarly classified networks, strategic and deployed systems, and between government departments and coalition partners.

The session will be a “must see” for information management professionals within Defence, as we present recent developments and preview forthcoming product capabilities, including:

       Substantial upgrade of the current Secure Information Management solution to meet the evolving needs of the Defence community, with new with new search capabilities, integration with Mercury and Objective, feedback capabilities, among other major updates.

       Implementation of SharePoint-based solutions that combine the familiarity of the Microsoft user experience with Berkeley IT’s proven track record in understanding and delivering solutions that satisfy the unique requirements of Defence.

The session will demonstrate the practical benefits of reduced administrative overhead and improved information security that Berkeley IT’s solutions are delivering every day, with:

       collaboration via chat, wikis, blogs, information push and pull and semantic linking;

       content management via information creation or upload of files, integration and interoperation;

       federated enterprise search via integration with existing search platforms;

       information categorisation, logging, reporting, workflow, tasking, management and delivery via flexible, customisable and enforceable metadata capture, interaction and presentation;

       intelligent information replication across security boundaries and strategic and deployed environments;

       information security via comprehensive, accredited and configurable security rules;

       information delivery, management; and

       records keeping compliance.

 

2.6b Product Brief: The L-TAC Solution – Providing UHF MILSAT Com via Inmarsat

Presenter: Mr Todd McDonell, Vice President Global Government Solutions, Inmarsat

 

Military users have long recognised the value and utility of satellite based UHF communications (TACSAT). Inmarsat and Spectra Ltd have jointly developed an innovative solution that allows military users to use their existing UHF radios across the Inmarsat I4 satellite network. The L-TAC solution includes a small adaptor unit and antenna system that require no user configuration. Inmarsat will provide a full briefing on the product, the product roadmap and how it can be used to support the modern soldier.

Inmarsat will also present an update on the GX programme, another major investment programme by Inmarsat that will provide significant benefits to the military CIS user.

 

2.6c Product Brief: Mesh Networking at the Tactical Edge

Presenter: Mr Jimi Henderson, Vice President of Sales, Silvus Technologies

 

In recent decades, wireless transmissions systems have evolved to provide reliable communications in harsh and dynamic environments. Using digital coding and modulating techniques, reception in high scatter and even some non-line-of-sight situations became possible. But as the use of video sensors and other high bandwidth devices continues to grow, so too does the need for high performance communications systems to tie them all together. But today’s systems have approached fundamental limits in their capabilities, and lack the range, throughput, and robustness demanded by today’s missions.

In this session we will discuss the capability gaps that exist for communications at the tactical edge. We will cover the systems that are currently available today, and how techniques such as Coded Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (COFDM), Multi-in Multi-out (MIMO) antenna technology, and Mobile Ad Hoc Networking (MANET) can be used in combination to provide high bandwidth communications in even the harshest environments.

We will conclude with a live demonstration of Silvus Technologies MN-MIMO technology, which was funded in part by the United States Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in order to solve the challenges that exist for the warfighter at the tactical edge.

 

2.7a Update: The Human Factors in SATCOM (RF) Interference: Creating More Effective Mitigation Teams

Presenter: Mr Rob Rideout, SAT Corporation

 

It is convenient to think of problems such as RF interference by reducing it to its technical form. However, in the operator’s world view, it’s far more than a phenomenon of physics; it’s a human-centred challenge to be solved as quickly and inexpensively as possible, with the least amount of disruption to customers and service. Until we have fully self-healing networks, and magic push button technology, we’ll continue to rely on (the often unheralded) human who lies at the centre of the equation. Rather than a wish list of blue sky hypotheticals, we discuss the most practical and impactful areas for improving the human performance when it comes to RF interference.

 

2.7b Update: New Technologies for RF Interference Mitigation (Noise Cancelling Headphones for Your RF Modems)

Presenters: Mr Stuart Daughtridge, Kratos & Mr Bob Potter, SAT Corporation

 

Satellite and terrestrial RF communications are critical components of the modern military infrastructures and operations, making RF interference a serious issue. For satellite based communication, as much as 1–2% of all satellite capacity is impaired by some type of RF interference. Worse yet, the sources of RF interference are growing as more satellites are launched, as more RF spectrum is allocated for terrestrial applications, and as more rouge countries and political groups recognize jamming as a low cost, effective method of eliminating the asymmetric advantages that satellite communications provides. The story of terrestrial RF communications is similar.

Technology to rapidly detect, characterize, and geolocate interference has steadily improved, but now a new capability has emerged that allows satellite users to go the next step, and actually mitigate the impacts of RF interference.

This presentation will focus on this new technology area of mitigating the effects of RF interference. Think of this new technology like having a noise cancelling headphone for your modem. This capability is able to reduce the level of the interference such that the desired signal can still be processed, even in the presence of intentional interference. For the first time, this new technology allows RF communications systems the ability to autonomously operate through RF interferences events, without impact to the communications service. The capabilities and limitations of this new technology, as well as the target applications will be reviewed in the presentation.

 

2.7c Product Brief: Delivering Programs On Time, Budget And Specification

Presenter: Ms Jessica White, Dassault Systemes Australia Pty Ltd

 

Major Defence programs have traditionally faced extensive delays and cost overruns. Departments of Defence across the world strongly rely on their large suppliers to manage complex capital projects including submarines. Niche software applications have failed to properly handle project complexities and risks. Dassault Systemes proposes a unique platform named On Time to Sea that aims at having Departments of Defence and Program Offices in control of projects for delivery on time, budget and specifications.

This presentation is intended to give an overview of the Navy Vessels industry, including Submarines, and provides information on how new generation off-the-shelf IT platforms bring innovative and comprehensive solutions for information management and flow throughout the product lifecycle, from specifications, scheduling, contracts through to regulatory compliance.

It begins with a brief introduction on the industry trends and challenges for naval ships. It then focuses on current market expectations with respect to on time and on budget delivery, as well as program and supply chain management. The paper describes the competitive landscape with a summary of how specific off-the-shelf IT platforms compare to other IT solutions. It then covers the On Time To Sea platform in detail.

 

2.8a Product Brief: Wi-Fi for Classified and High-Security Environments

Presenter: Mr Donald Meyer, Aruba Networks

 

Military users are often wary of Wi-Fi, believing the technology to be fundamentally unsecure. In this presentation, we’ll show how Wi-Fi and other commercial technologies are being used today to enable mobile computing and communication devices in high security environments. The presentation will be technical in nature and will explore architectures employed by military and intelligence users around the globe, such as Suite B cryptography and hardware-based strong authentication systems. We will specifically explore the US National Security Agency’s “Commercial Solutions for Classified” program, which other nations are looking to as a model for how to bring Wi-Fi and commercial mobile devices into classified environments.

 

2.8b Product Brief: Deploying SharePoint into Geographically Distributed Environments

Presenter: James Milne, Director, Myriad Technologies

 

Sharing information across any geographically disbursed environment with intermittent network connectivity and security classifications presents a number of challenges. As SharePoint has become embedded in many organisations to enable collaboration and provide an information sharing platform the need to solve these challenges has become more and more critical.

Myriad Technologies has developed a number of patterns and practices for deploying SharePoint into environments with limited or no network connectivity. The information collected in the field can then be replicated from one site to another based on metadata to ensure everyone can access mission critical information in a timely manner. This enables tactical decisions to be made with the most up-to-date information available. The ability to have information collected and classified in the field and shared with anyone in headquarters or other parts of the theatre provides a tactical advantage in many fields of operation.

After the field operations have been completed the data collected from the operation can be automatically replicated back home to provide a record of the activities and outcomes from the field. These field records can then be integrated into your organisational records management system to ensure the records are classified, searchable and managed.

During this session we will explore the various deployment patterns that can be used to enable collaboration and intelligence sharing in the field. We will also explore the options for retrieving records from the field to ensure the record management and disposal of documents created can be managed back home in command and control. We will also demonstrate how metadata based security can be applied to SharePoint content to protect your content from unauthorised access.

 

2.8c Tutorial: Collaboration in the Field

Presenter: James Milne, Director, Myriad Technologies

 

This session will demonstrate how SharePoint can be leveraged as a collaboration platform in the field to share and exchange critical information in a timely manner. During this session we will demonstrate how information can be shared and updated in a collaborative manner. Using SharePoint to dynamically create content online can dramatically change how information is shared within your organisation. Come along to this session to see how SharePoint can change the way you work today.

 

2.9a Tutorial: Software Defined Radios—Key Enablers for Network Centric Operations

Presenter: Mr Robert Traeger, Rohde-Schwarz

 

Networking across all operational levels is the first and foremost condition for efficient, modern warfare. Network centric operations (NCO) require the use SCA based software defined radios (SDR) in combination with high data rate waveforms which deliver the following capabilities:

  • Tap-proof, jam resistant information transmission,
  • Simultaneous voice and data transmission,
  • Support of external IP based applications and
  • Interconnection of homogenous information networks over IP.

For international, combined missions, waveforms providing interoperability need to be ported to the software-defined radios.

This tutorial will describe the challenges in developing the latest generation of Software Defined Radios and discuss their application in typical operational scenarios.

 

2.9c Product Brief: Arming the Department of Defence with Information Intelligence

Presenter: Francesco Millazzo, Technical Consultant, Dassault Systemes Australia Pty Ltd

 

The Department of Defence today is facing an information and knowledge access crisis. Most of the essential knowledge that is needed to thrive in a highly competitive environment is inaccessible to the people who need it most: decision makers, employees, customers and partners. Database access tools, CRM, ERP, CMS, DMS are restrictive, access to the information is siloed and employees often have no tools at all for locating and exploiting the ‘unstructured’ data that makes up the bulk of corporate information assets—information encapsulated in resources such as documents, intranets, forums, collaboration tools, RSS feeds, videos, images and social media. In this context EXALEAD opens the door to significant opportunities for the Department of Defence to drive innovation leveraging BIG DATA.

EXALEAD CloudView is a unified information access platform enabling a new generation of innovative Search-Based Applications (SBAs) as well as providing superior enterprise and web search. CloudView leverages unstructured and structured data from any source, in any format and in any volume, and automatically transforms it into a single structured information resource. Join us into this voyage to see how our technologies can be used to solve a broad range of problems, from information intelligence for Homeland Security to a 360° view of important assets hidden in the BIG DATA.


Session Presentations: Day 3—14 November 2013

 

3.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: Laying the Foundations of Big Data Solutions

Presenters: Mr Andrew McGee, Presales Director, Hitachi Data Systems

 

Andrew McGee, Northern Presales Director at Hitachi Data Systems will be presenting on the technology underpinning Big Data and today’s need to handle extremely large data sets as seen in the geospatial imaging, government and research sectors.

Andrew has spent over 20 years in Information Technology working with numerous organisations from various industries such as government and defence, finance, mining, manufacturing and insurance. With a mainframe storage background, Andrew specialises in storage networking, enterprise data protection and information solutions.

In this presentation we will explore the nature of this type of data in a military and industry context, where it’s come from, how it’s changed over time and what it’s likely to look like in the future.

We look at the challenges with ingesting, protecting and moving large data sets both at rest and in transit and investigate some of the current technologies and techniques in use such as object storage, meta data, federated search and analysis.

Why are technologies such as object storage relevant to big data and how is this new paradigm different to traditional methods of storing and managing large amounts of data. Why is meta data so important and how do we leverage it to drive more value from data.

Are there methods we can use for optimisation and efficiencies when we have extremely large data sets? Do we have to sacrifice utility for efficiency and what really is the impact of technologies like de-duplication and compression to our operational solutions?

The above questions will be addressed in relation to real world use cases and solutions within the geospatial imaging, government and research areas.

 

3.2 Plenary Session—Navy, Army, Air Force CIS Interoperability

Moderator: GPCAPT Darren May, Director Military Engagement (DME)

Keynote Address: CMDR David Prentice, Director General Navy Communications and Information Warfare

Keynote Address: COL Shaun Love, Director Network Enabled Warfare, Army

Keynote Address: WGCDR Daniel McManus, Director CIS, Air Force

 

3.3 Plenary Session: The Future of Threat Intelligence: How Threat Operations on the Internet Reveals Fascinating Things

Keynote Address: Mr John N. Stewart, Senior Vice President and Chief Security Officer, Cisco

 

A computing device’s Internet Protocol (IP) address is more than its calling card. It is the starting point for a chain of evidence that can reveal a device’s reputation, identify its users, activity history, behaviours, functions, and other devices it’s contacted. The evidence chain grows even more powerful when security analysts can correlate global threat intelligence with local IT infrastructure and network operational data pertaining to the IP address under scrutiny. This talk by Cisco CSO John Stewart presents real world examples of the current state of threat intelligence and analysis and projects it into a future IT universe of tens of billions of mobile, Internet of Things, and virtual devices.

 

3.4a Update: Understanding the Foundational Elements Underpinning the Development of Good Cyber Resilient Practices

Presenter: Mr Gary Hale, Director Cyber Security Initiatives, Cisco

 

Cyber Security is a term often used, but generally not well understood. It involves clarity around understanding your business and/or operational risks, your command and/or governance model, and evolving this into policy, that jointly drives people, process and technology decisions to create an ecosystem that maximises your resilience to cyber threats. Now, and into the future, you must be able to inject learnings into your network, either through design evolution, or network automation, and this must start happening at machine speed. It requires understanding how information is stored, deployed and transitioned across your networks, how it is used, as well as what normal behaviour looks like—that is, your network DNA. Underpinning this is your ability to limit those risks through the network development process from IT design through to use of operational Intelligence to drive network outcomes. The aim of this update will be to provide a basic framework for understanding the key processes for creating cyber resilience, and the central role the network plays in supporting this.

 

3.4b Update: Network Cyber Security—Defend, Discover, Remediate

Presenter: Mr Matt Carling, Cisco

 

The network is a core component for many providers of critical infrastructure and organisations with network centric operations such as Defence. Whilst the network is often the delivery mechanism for cyber threats it also offers significant opportunities for cyber defence. This update session will cover the applicability of widely available network services and capabilities across a ‘defend, discover, remediate’ approach to cyber security; defensive preparations serve two important purposes—help eliminate disclosure of information that an adversary can use in developing an attack strategy and second, help eliminate and protect against weaknesses and vulnerabilities in the infrastructure; discovery capabilities provide visibility into infrastructure systems and operations, helping reveal indicators of potential threats and attacks; and remediation provides the ability to block, manage, and redirect attacks. In addition to covering network capabilities deployable today, the potential for Software Defined Networking to enhance cyber security will be discussed.

 

3.4c Update: The Narrowing Air-Gap: Cyber Warfare in the Tactical Domain

Presenter: LCDR Gideon Creech, School of Engineering and IT, UNSW Canberra

 

NCW provides huge scope for more efficient war fighting, and is arguably one of the greatest force multipliers to arise in recent times. The increasing prevalence of NCW nodes in the battlespace, however, opens several sinister cyber warfare threat vectors based on an enemy s potential physical access to a captured node, hence ushering Cyber Warfare into the tactical domain. Furthermore, with the use of TCP/IP protocols now forming a de facto standard for NCW devices, the suite of hacking tools available to the civilian cyber operative now has a significant role to play on the battleground of tomorrow.

The distinct possibility of enemy access to end-user nodes coupled with the portability of civilian open source hacking TTPs to the battlefield mean that the air gap which has traditionally protected classified networks is now much smaller than in previous eras, and blue force information security operatives must consequently adapt to a much harsher environment.

This presentation will highlight the increasing threat from cyber warfare at the tactical level, and specifically address methods of exploiting a captured NCW node. Technical topics will include man-in-the-middle attacks, encryption bypass, and dynamic traffic filtering. Policy-focused topics will include exploitation of enemy assets, the adaptation of civilian TCP/IP hacking tools to the military arena, and the ramifications of tactical Cyber Warfare on the joint warfare environment.

 

3.5a Tutorial: : Executive Overview of MIDS Link 16 Tutorial

Presenter: Mr Patrick Pierson, Director Network Centric Solutions (NCS)

 

The purpose of this stream is to paint a basic picture of Link 16, its challenges, and its future in an informative and entertaining manner.

This module aims is to develop a basic understanding of why Link 16 is so important, why it is so difficult to implement correctly, why Link 16 works perfectly (or nearly so) at some levels, and why interoperability is so difficult at other levels. This module will cover:

                     The Purpose of Tactical Data Links

                     What Makes the Link Work?

                     The Power of Link 16

                     Link 16 Video

                     Why is Link 16 So Important?

                     Link 16 Interoperability Basics

                     Examples of Link 16 System Integration

                     The Challenge of Link 16 Interoperability

                     Link 16 Message Standards

                     How Interpretation Impacts Interoperability

                     Why Link 16 Terminals Play Well Together

                     The Link 16 Timeline

                     TDL Comparison

This module also aims to develop a comprehensive understanding of why terminals use a spectrum that is reserved globally for flight safety systems, how terminals cause interference, why terminals always interfere with TACAN / DME, why that is normally not a problem, and how we can control and mitigate this interference. This session will cover:

                     Why in the World Did They Choose 969-1206 MHz?

                     The Study

                     Systems that Share Lx Band with Link 16

                     How TACAN / DME Work

                     The Problem with Link 16 Terminals

                     Why Link 16 Will Always Interfere with TACAN / DME

                     Why is That Okay?

                     How Does the Terminal Protect the Spectrum?

                     Levels of Spectrum Protection

                     The Consequences of Interference Protection Feature Violations

                     How Does the Terminal Modify the Initialisation Data Set to Protect the Spectrum?

                     What is Time Slot Duty Factor?

                     Why does Time Slot Duty Factor matter?

 

3.5b Tutorial: MIDS Link 16 and JREAP Tutorial

Presenter: Mr Patrick Pierson, Director Network Centric Solutions (NCS)

 

The purpose of this module is to develop a basic understanding of the language of Joint Range Extension Application Protocol (JREAP), associated Joint Range Extension systems, and how they relate to Link 16. This module will also describe how JREAP is fielded operationally as well as the future of JREAP.

                     What is JREAP?

                     Why was JREAP Created?

                     How is JREAP Related to Link 16?

                     Is JREAP Better Than Link 16?

                     What are the Different Versions of JREAP?

                     Which JREAP Version is the Best?

                     Who Uses JREAP?

                     What JREAP Systems are Out There?

                     What Does JREAP Cost?

                     Can JREAP Replace Link 16?

                     How is JREAP Really Used in the Field?

                     What is the Future of JREAP

 

3.5c Tutorial: MIDS Link 16 Terminal Variants Modernisation and Developments

Presenter: Mr Patrick Pierson, Director Network Centric Solutions (NCS)

 

The purpose of this module is to describe the primary roles of the terminal (in simple terms), create an understanding of all of the terminal variants, and the logic behind why there are so many variants (it’s much simpler than you might think). We will then describe the future of Link 16 as well as the Link 16 enhancement programs currently underway. This session will cover:

                     What Does the Terminal Actually Do?

                     Link 16 Terminal Variants

                     MIDS Terminal Advantages

                     MIDS Terminal Manufacturers

                     Terminal Variations Simplified

                     The Future of Link 16, and will cover:

o   Frequency Remapping

o   Crypto Modernization

o   Enhanced Throughput

o   Concurrent Multi-Netting

o   Concurrent Contention Receive

o   Flexible Access Secure Transfer

o   Network Enabled Weapons

o   Use of Full Motion Video

 

3.6a Tutorial: A Workshop on Interference Suppression on Fixed and Mobile Platforms

Presenter: Dr Steve Nightingale, Cobham Technical Services

 

Fixed and mobile platforms frequently have a restriction on where the antennas for the RF equipment can be sited. This usually results in most of the antennas being placed in close proximity on the platform leading to high levels of mutual coupling causing significant interference issues. Receiving radios are often completely blocked or significantly desensitised. This workshop will discuss different types of RF interference suppression systems based on the use of a number of techniques including: RF interference cancellation, antenna adaptive nulling and time domain multiplexing together with practical results that have been measured on fixed and mobile platforms.

Equipment has been developed and demonstrated to UK, US, and Commonwealth representatives, which can remove the following types of interfering signals from on-board equipment to restore the sensitivity of communications radios:

1. Large off-channel signals from high power communications radios.

2. Broadband on-channel signals from ECM equipment.

Adaptive nulling techniques have also been developed for advanced GPS receivers to suppress a number of off-board broadband, and narrowband jamming signals. Particular attention has been given to minimising the size, weight and power so that they can be deployed on small platforms such as helicopters or land vehicles. Extensive testing has been carried out to demonstrate the performance of the equipment using both advanced indoor simulation facilities and outdoor trials on airborne platforms.

 

3.7a Update: ADF Common Data Link Management and International Advancements

Presenter: Mr Gerry Kawamura, Senior Systems Engineer, L-3 Communications

 

The US DoD has enjoyed the benefits of increased Common Data Link (CDL) functionality in their airborne and terrestrial wide-band communication system. As the ADF modernises its ISR capability, the number of CDL systems and the functionality of those systems continues to increase. This update session will delineate the management issues and benefits associated with CDL proliferation. Additionally, it will summarize the full spectrum of information flow that can be enjoyed at every level of command.

As the number of number and capability of ADF ISR assets and information networks expand, information management and rapid passage of time-sensitive information to all levels of command drives the network availability and throughput. Recent operations continue to substantiate the requirement for passage of real-time full-motion video in order to target accurately in time-sensitive situations. The current contracted radio networks are unable to cope adequately with the required throughput and wide dissemination of information in a line-of-sight (LOS) nor beyond-LOS (BLOS) form. Mesh CDL networks are now available for the tactical passage of high data rates in LOS and BLOS environments with data rates in excess of10Mbps to the tactical edge users.

 

3.7b Update: Evaluation for Enhanced Broadcast and Ship-to-Shore Solutions

Presenters: Mr Radek Novak, Rohde & Schwarz

 

The BRASS (Broadcast and Ship Shore) initial core capacity (BICC), defines a baseline implementation of the BRASS concept, limited to basic functionalities. The BICC relies on the legacy messaging standard ACP127. Furthermore, ACP 127 radio circuits are enhanced with the error correction mechanisms (ARQ) provided by STANAG 5066.

The state-of-the-art messaging standard STANAG 4406 specifies the requirements for modern military communications and was designed to meet today s needs in maritime applications. STANAG 4406 ANNEX E provides considerable benefits for naval communications. Automated processes, multicasting of messages, including error-correction mechanisms, built-in security features, support of attachments, and many other capabilities reduce operator interaction and responsibility. Therefore, STANAG 4406 ANNEX E should now definitely be taken into account when designing or redesigning a BRASS system.

This presentation shall show the current concept based on BRASS Enhancements Increment Target Architecture (BREITA) and shall be understood as a basis for discussion for further consolidation of the system requirements.

 

3.7c Update: TACPOD and the Tyranny of Distance

Presenters: Mr Ray Munoz & Mr Tom Ratliff, Ultra Electronics Advanced Tactical Systems

 

As TACPOD (Tactical Command, Control and Communications Pod) completes flight testing, there are important conclusions regarding the requirements, applications, and technologies for range extension and interoperability over the distances of the Pacific. Mr Munoz will present the technologies, flight test experience, and conclusion regarding the way ahead in the context of TACPOD as pertinent to Australian and US Forces.

 

3.8a Update: RPDE Update

Presenter: Mr Ken Snell, RPDE Engagement Manager & Colonel Sheldon Kidd, Director Joint Force Integration, CDG

 

The RPDE Mission is to accelerate and enhance Australian Defence Force (ADF) war-fighting capability through innovation and collaboration. RPDE is a unique collaboration between Defence, industry and academia, bringing together the best and brightest from across the defence industry spectrum. When these forces join in a neutral, non-competitive environment, knowing that intellectual property and commercial interests are protected, the results are formidable. This update will focus on work underway or recently completed in the military communications and information systems domain. Colonel Sheldon Kidd will provide commentary related to impacts of RPDE work and relationships to project work underway in the information systems domain as it applies to CDG.

 

3.8b Update: The Potential for 3D Printing in the ADF

Presenter: LT Jacob Choi, Army School of Ordnance

 

The converging technologies of NFC, cloud computing and 3D printing offers both an efficient benefit and potent threat to Defence s capabilities. While enabling a rapid fabrication system to minimise the supply chain, 3D printing also allows adversaries to build similar applications for equipment and stores.

This update will review the latest developments in 3D printing and how it is used in Afghanistan by US forces. A cost benefit analysis will also show that China’s 3D printing for titanium parts of its J-15 fighter makes economical and practical sense for the defence industry.

What does this mean for the ADF s supply chain for its forces? Imagine if a Combat Service Support Team (CSST) is able to manufacture parts for its mechanics, or if a naval fleet can harvest its 3D printing material from the ocean. A C-130 will be able to deploy a 3D print lab to any location in the world within 18 hours and blueprints for production should be readily available from coalition partners via the internet. However, the same technology may be used against the ADF if adversaries transform a home office into a home factory capable of producing weapons or bomb components. Cyber terrorism may also see parties who are free from motivations to harm civilians yet publish military hardware blueprints as internet files.

3D printing is already becoming a commercial weapon of choice to undermine the traditional factory production line, and it has the potential to undermine the ADF’s OODA loop if action is not taken.

 

3.8c Update: Radiofrequency Spectrum Management with Spectrum XXI Software

Presenter: Mr Ian Layzell, CIOG

This presentation will be ITAR and as such only ADF Members and Commonwealth employees can attend.

 

The Department of Defence is the largest single user of radiofrequency (RF) spectrum in Australia. Defence has over 6,000 radiocommunications licenses that enable over 21,000 frequency assignments to be made to Defence users. These assignments authorise the operation of hundreds of diverse systems from combat net radios to surveillance radars.

In order to manage this complexity and allow the ADF to manage spectrum as part of the battlespace the DSO is bringing in to service a number of spectrum management and planning software tools for ADF use. One of these tools is Spectrum XXI (pronounced Spectrum twenty-one ) via Foreign Military Sales from the United States.

Spectrum XXI is an automated spectrum management tool that supports spectrum planning as well as near real-time management of radiofrequency spectrum with emphasis on assigning compatible frequencies and performing spectrum engineering tasks.

This tutorial will introduce attendees to the basic functions of Spectrum XXI: searching the assignment database, interference analysis, frequency nomination, data exchange, restricted frequency lists and other such spectrum management issues. This will be done through practical examples and showing how Spectrum XXI operates and what RF spectrum management tasks it can automate.

 

3.9a Services and Applications Stream

 

Paper 1: Information Exchange within Modern Services and Applications

Presenter: Mr Brad Tobin, Aerospace Division, DSTO

 

Abstract. Within the Tactical Information Exchange Domain and Joint Data Network is defined a number of mobile and fixed, wireless data networks. These are Multi-TDL Networks, Ground Networks, Intelligence Networks and Sensor Networks. Historically, these networks have employed independent data link standards based on different exchange protocols and processors, representing a close coupling between the specific information exchanged and the communication bearers over which it is exchanged. Recent efforts have attempted to address this through minimising the use of proprietary standards and prioritising the implementation of a common family of messaging standards. These standards offer guidance on the information to be exchanged between systems, but does very little to address the host system’s coupling to its computing platform, operating system and other infrastructure. Ignoring this element does little to help the upgrade cycle of systems, which continue to exhibit difficulties in modifying and extending the original capabilities. This paper will explore principles that can assist new development and through-life support cycles, while maintaining interoperability between systems and extending information sharing to the component level.

 

Paper 2: The Move Beyond Data Links

Presenters: Dr Philip Cutler and Dr Christos Sioutis, Aerospace Division, DSTO

 

Abstract. Two technologies—wideband SATCOM providing broad area, high bandwidth IP force-wide networking connectivity, and the use of standards based, open architecture mission systems built on CORBA, offer a potential to dramatically change the way in which mission systems are designed and deployed within the battle-space. As the technologies are being incorporated into platforms there is a need to consider both how information is created and shared within the future battle-space. At present each platform type is built around a dedicated, bespoke, mission system which incorporates capabilities, for example, to enable the detection of entities, the fusion of both on-board and off-board data to system tracks, situation picture compilation and the sharing of data. The progress adoption of a force-wide high bandwidth IP network and CORBA-based mission systems opens up the possible of moving beyond the sharing of data between mission systems, and toward the ability to share information, software components, indeed capabilities across the force; much in the way of the internet. The current paper will explore examples of how such an approach could be utilised and the operational impacts which may be transpire.

 

3.9b Services and Applications Stream

 

Paper 3: Architecting Composite Component Systems for Heterogeneous Environments with Open Standards

Presenter: Mr Derek Dominish, Aerospace Division, DSTO

 

Abstract. With the recent adoption of a service oriented architectural (SOA) approach to application development within defence worldwide there is a need to provide architectural guidance coupled with infrastructure mechanisms to assist developers through the implementation process. Applications developed under a SOA approach are more akin to an assemblage rather than the more traditional development methodology of construct and execute. With the introduction of newer style C2 platforms into service within the Australian Defence Force (ADF), including the future delivery of both the JSF and P8 aircraft on the horizon, all of which contain middleware based SOA mission systems, it is expected that SOA will dominate future air defence offerings. Furthermore there is a growing collection of common services to aid in the integration of such systems into the tactical defence environment. However there exists the need to manage the availability of these services and their usage by applications and systems through a common approach to infrastructure, configuration and deployment. This presentation will firstly describe how an application can be assembled with separate and distinct service components to form a composite application and then secondly how these components can be interconnected through a common patterned approach to infrastructure that incorporates elements of CCM with its connectors through a Gestalt patterned approach. This common infrastructure, based on OMG open standards, is necessary to manage the availability, configuration and deployment of hosted components. This change of emphasis to a patterned approach to application composition and assembly brings with it some unique challenges for both mission system architects and developers alike.

 

Paper 4: Assurance of Distributed Systems

Presenters: Dr R.J. O’Dowd and Mr M.J. Davies, Aerospace Division, DSTO

 

Abstract. The Australian Defence Organisation strategically seeks and embraces benefits of Network Centric Warfare technologies and techniques. One aspect is the development and eventual acceptance of increasingly complex distributed mission systems into service on military aircraft. These systems are increasingly being composed of legacy and proprietary systems that are not designed to interoperate, that represent information in different and often incompatible ways, posing challenges with ensuring data integrity and addressing inconsistency or incompatibility of data reference points such as coordinate systems, and especially with regard to networked systems. The increasing complexity makes it more difficult to provide objective evidence that the information generated or relayed by these systems can be trusted. This discussion paper discusses considerations in providing appropriate levels of assurance for complex distributed systems in conservative safety-conscious application domains like Defence networks, which are subject to increasing legal constraint and regulatory complexity, increasing personal accountability of decision makers, and growing employment of those systems in the military kill chain.

 

3.9c Product Brief: Tactical Data Links Over Copper (DON10)—Simple and Effective Alternative to Fibre-Optics

Presenter: Mr Alec Umansky, Defence Communications Industry

 

Tactical Data Links—rapidly deployed, simple to use, effective and reliable are vital in modern military operations. Specifically, network roll-out in difficult and harsh environment where a lack of line-of-sight makes radio and wireless systems impossible to use, remains a major obstacle. The vulnerability of fibre-optic cable to damage is another constant and costly problem.

That is why a new transmission technology allowing fast bandwidth up to 60 Mbps / 8 km over copper cables (plain telephone wire or DON10) provides an extremely effective alternative. SHDSL is special digital modulation technology that allows data to be transmitted over long distances over copper. It is a secure, low power transmission that offers many practical advantages to fibre-optics in terms of cost, distance, ad-hoc connectivity. The products described in presentation paper represent 12 years of research in the field by a niche specialist company, including extensive trials and operational deployments by the Australian, New Zealand, British, and other armies.

Defence Communications Industry Pty Ltd is Australian specialist company that designs, manufactures, supports and trains its increasing customer base. DCI products are unique, technologically advanced and represent the best of industry and Defence collaboration.