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Program

&

Conference Handbook

 

 

 

Program: Day 1 - Tuesday 14 November 2017. 2

Program: Day 2 - Wednesday 15 November 2017. 3

Program: Day 3 - Thursday 16 November 2017. 4

Session Abstracts: Day 1 - 14 November 2017. 5

Session Abstracts: Day 2 - 15 November 2017. 10

Session Abstracts: Day 3 - 16 November 2017. 16

 


Day 1—Tuesday 14 November 2017

07:30am

Session 1.1 Breakfast Session: Exhibition open and coffee available

                      Product Brief: Defence Cloud – Digitally Enabling Defence,  Mr Steve Michelotti, Chief Evangelist – Azure Cloud Engineering, Microsoft

9:00am

 

Session 1.2 Plenary Session: Opening Session

   Welcome: Professor Michael Frater, Rector UNSW Canberra and Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Acting Chief Information Officer, Defence

   Keynote Address: Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Acting Chief Information Officer, Defence

10.00am

Morning Tea

10.30am

Session 1.3 Plenary Session:

Future CIS Capability

   Keynote Address: AVM Mel Hupfeld, Head Force Design

   Keynote Address: Mr Peter Corcoran, Assistant Secretary ICT Architecture

Operations Support to the Future Force

   Keynote Address: AVM Andrew Dowse, Head ICT Operations Division, CIOG

   Keynote Address: Ms Kathryn Jones, Director Defence Engagement, Telstra

12.30pm

Lunch     Session 1.4 Product Brief: Device Security Challenges for Military and Defense (Mr Sameer Dixit, Spirent Communications)

1.30pm

Session 1.5a

Update:  Disruption: The Mother of Innovation?

(Mr Andy Start, Inmarsat Global Government)

Session 1.6a

Product Brief:  Tactical Data Center

(Mr David Huisenga, Klas Telecom Government, Inc.)

Session 1.7a

Product Brief:  Building on the ADF’s Pharmaceutical and Medical Supply Process to Deliver a Better Healthcare Service for Members

(Mr Bruce Moors, Ocean Software)

 

Session 1.8a                        IEEE STREAM

Paper 1: A Framework for the Evaluation of the Theoretical Threat Coverage Provided by Intrusion Detection System

Paper 2: Collaborative Anomaly Detection Framework for Handling Big Data of Cloud Computing

Session 1.9a             INDUSTRY STREAM

Paper 1: Making the Most of a Consolidated C2 Framework

Paper 2: Enabling PNT Assurance at all Threat Levels'

2.30pm

Session 1.5b

Product Brief: Technology Advancements in SATCOM for Airborne C2 and ISR Networks

(Mr Jeff Lessner, Defense Systems at Hughes)

Session 1.6b

Product Brief:  Insight from Network Analytics with Cisco Tetration

(Mr Aaron Kerr, Cisco Systems)

Session 1.7b

Product Brief:  Extracting a Real-Time Force Readiness Picture from Big Data

(Mr Grant McHerron, Ocean Software)

Session 1.8b                        IEEE STREAM

Paper 1: Privacy Preservation Intrusion Detection Technique for SCADA Systems

Paper 2: Changing Users' Security Behaviour Towards Security Questions: A Game-based Learning Approach

Session 1.9b             INDUSTRY STREAM

Paper 1: A Model for Concept of Operations for ADF Cyber Capabilities– Network Management and Technical Control

Paper 2: Adapting Long Term Evolution (LTE) / Fifth Generation (5G) Mobile Networks for Military Use

3.30pm

 

 

4.00pm

Session 1.5c

Product Brief: BDATech: Completing the Mission Through Adaptable Communications Platforms

(Mr Greg Whitehouse, Black Diamond Advanced Technology)

Session 1.6c

Product Brief:  Visibility, Intelligence and Automation with Digital Network Architecture

(Mr Chris Miles, Cisco Systems)

Session 1.7c

Product Brief:  Achieving Instant Situational Awareness in Secure C2 Environments

(Mr Joseph Pajer, Thinklogical)

Session 1.8c                         IEEE STREAM

Paper 1: Architecture of XMPP Proxy for Server-To-Server Connections

Paper 2: Design and Modelling of Energy Efficient WSN Architecture for Tactical Applications

Session 1.9c

Product Brief:  The Weaponry of Insight - Fostering Innovation in Defence Operations

(Ms Juliane Gallina, IBM)

5.00pm

to 6:30pm

Welcome Networking Drinks

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 6:30pm (open to exhibition-only registration from 1:30pm to 4:30pm) / IEEE Stream (Refereed papers) co-sponsored by IEEE

 


Day 2—Wednesday 15 November 2017

07:30am

Session 2.1   Breakfast Session—Exhibition open and coffee available

                       Product Brief: Bringing Innovation to Industry,  Mr Byron Bignoux, Nearsat

9.00am

Session 2.2 Plenary Session: Joint Capability Acquisition

    Keynote Address: Mr Paul Cazaz, First Assistant Secretary, ICT Delivery

    Keynote Address: Mr Ivan Zlabur, First Assistant Secretary Joint Systems

10.30am

Morning Tea

11.00am

Session 2.3 Plenary Session: Joint Capability and Information Warfare

    Keynote Address: MAJGEN Marcus Thompson, Deputy Chief Information Warfare Division

    Keynote Address: Dr Tobias Feakin, Australia’s Cyber Ambassador

12.30pm

Lunch     Session 2.4 Product Brief: Migrate to the Cloud with Confidence (Mr Michael Segal, NETSCOUT Systems)

1.30pm

Session 2.5a

Cyber and State

(Mr Tom Uren, ASPI & Dr Gareth Parker, DSTG Research Leader, Cyber Sensing and Shaping)

Session 2.6a

Update:  Joint Force Headquarters

(COL Wade Johnson)

Session 2.7a

Tutorial:  Implementing an EIM Strategy on SharePoint Frequently Fails in Organizations like Defence – Why? – And Understand how to Succeed!

(Mr Perry Smith & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies)

Session 2.8a

Product Brief:  Real World Examples on how the US Navy Leverages Data to Perform Condition Based Maintenance

(Mr Ben Davis, Teradata)

Session 2.9a

Update: CBM-400: Multi-Mission Modem and Flexible Waveform

(Mr Andy Lincoln, ViaSat Inc.)

 

2.30pm

Session 2.5b

Big Data—Risks and Resilience

(Mr Berin Lautenbach, Chief Security Officer, Telstra)

Big Data—Data Mining

(Dr Brenton Cooper, Data to Decisions Cooperative Research Centre)

Session 2.6b

Product Brief:  Gaining Insight from Unstructured Data to Accelerate the Decision Cycle

(Mr Rafael Jozwiak, Janes & Mr David Waxman, IBM)

Session 2.7b

Tutorial: Highly Secure SharePoint - Including Cross Domain

(Mr Perry Smith & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies)

Session 2.8b

Update:  Australia's Communication Capabilities Available on ViaSat-3, a Global Ka-band Satellite Constellation

(Mr Craig Miller, ViaSat Inc.)

Session 2.9b

Update:  How an ISP Fights the Bad Guys with Integrated Cybersecurity Technology and a Cyber Resilient Network Architecture

(Mr Jon Korecki, ViaSat Inc.)

3.30pm

Afternoon Tea

4.00pm to 5:00pm

Session 2.5c

Update:  Analytics for Defense from C4ISR to Health

(Dr Ryan Weil, Leidos)

Session 2.6c

Tutorial:  Building Multi Level Security Environments

(Mr Daniel Lai, archTIS)

Session 2.7c

Tutorial: Cradle to Grave Information Management - for the Warfighter

(Mr Perry Smith & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies)

Session 2.8c

Update:  Defence Spectrum Update

(Mr David Murray, Department of Defence)

Session 2.9c

Update:  Honey, I Hacked The SCADA! : Industrial CONTROLLED Systems!

(Mr Jon Korecki, ViaSat Inc.)

7.00pm–11.00pm

Conference Dinner  (7:00pm for 7:30pm)

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 5:00pm (open to exhibition-only registration from 1:30pm to 5:00pm)


Day 3—Thursday 16 November 2017

07:30am

Session 3.1 Breakfast Session—Product Brief: Maximising the Effectiveness of National Defence Forces through Disruptive Technology,  Mr Andrew Carwardine, Dynama Global

9.00am

 

Session 3.2 Plenary Session: One Defence

     Keynote Address: CAPT Lloyd Hewitt, RAN, Defence ERP

     Keynote Address: Ms Alice Jones, First Assistant Secretary, Service Delivery DSG

     Keynote Address: Mr Mathew Smorhun, Assistant Secretary ICT Strategy Realisation Branch

10.30am

Morning Tea

11.00am

Session 3.3a SecureCanberra

Welcome Address Mr Chuan-Wei Hoo, Technical Advisor, Asia-Pacific, (ISC)²

Securing the Enterprise in a High Data Velocity & Variety World Mr Stephen Kho, Micro Focus

Session 3.4a

Update: The Path to Achieving Australian GVA—Hawkei ICS is Just the First Step

(Mr Steven Welsh, CASG and Mr Peter Whalley, LEA)

Session 3.5a

Update:  Joint C4—Joint Command and Control

(BRIG Rose Vivian, COL Dan Hartigan, JC4 Branch, IW Division)

 

Session 3.6a

Product Brief: Why Doesn't SharePoint Properly Support the Conduct of Operations for the Warfighter, and How Can This be Changed?

(Mr Perry Smith & Mr Nathan Pearce,  Myriad Technologies)

Session 3.7a

Tutorial: Reference Frames, Coordinates, and Units: How to Use Them Without Tears

(Dr Don Koks, DSTG)

12:00pm

Session 3.3b SecureCanberra

Cyber Skilling for a Secure Australia Professor Jill Slay, UNSW Canberra

Session 3.4b

Update: Australian GVA Land Data Model (LDM) Development

(Mr Sibi Ravindran, LNIC)

Session 3.5b

Update:  Joint C4—Joint Communications

(BRIG Rose Vivian, GCAPT Colin Thomson, JC4 Branch, IW Division)

Session 3.6b

Tutorial: Open System Architecture Approach for Maritime Communications and Information Systems

(Mr Arthur Ollett, Thales Australia)

Session 3.7b

Product Brief: Cognitive AI for National Defence & Intelligence

(Mr Steve Michelotti, Microsoft)

1.00pm

Lunch     Session 3.3c Product Brief: Making Big Data Smart (Mr Michael Segal, NETSCOUT Systems)

2.00pm

Session 3.3d SecureCanberra

Basic Security Steps are Highly Effective but Most Often Overlooked Mr Michael Aboltins, Tenable

Session 3.4d

Update:  An Overview of Place in the Network (PINs) Reference Architecture for the Defence Fixed Strategic and Deployed Environments

(Mr Angelo Puglielli, Cisco)

Session 3.5d

 

Session 3.6d

Tutorial:  The Importance of the Information Exchange Requirement (IER) Capture Process

(Mr David Abel, LUMINACT Pty Ltd)

Session 3.7d

Product Brief: A New Era of Gigabit SATCOM Capability

(Mr Glen Tindall, SES Networks)

3.00pm

Session 3.3e SecureCanberra

Understanding the Threat

(Mr Edward Farrell, Mercury ISS)

Session 3.4e

Tutorial:  Simulation Modelling for Design of Battlespace Communications System (Land) Networks

(Dr Matthew Britton, Dr Andrew Coyle, Dr Bruce Northcote, University of Adelaide)

Session 3.5e

Update:  Airborne Networking in a Coalition Environment

(Mr Keith Smith, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems)

 

Session 3.6e

Update:  Joint Project 9101—Enhanced Defence High Frequency Communications System (EDHFCS)

(LTCOL James Brownlie, JP9101)

Session 3.7e

Update:  2017 Military CIS Workforce, Supply & Demand, Risks & Opportunities

(Mr Robert Kremer, Kinexus)

4.00pm

Afternoon Tea

4.30pm to 5:30pm

Session 3.3f  SecureCanberra

What will Next Generation Information Security be Like? Mr Chuan-Wei Hoo, ST Electronics Info-Security

Session 3.4f

Update:  Theory Meets Reality: Challenges and Solutions for Deploying MANET in Real Tactical Environments

(Mr Haidong Wang, TrellisWare Technologies)

Session 3.5f

Update: 2017 LNIC Trials and Initiatives

(MAJ Steve Markham and Dr Peter Holliday, LNIC)

 

Session 3.6f

Workshop:  Joint Project 9101—Project Phoenix

(LTCOL James Brownlie, JP9101)

Session 3.7f

 

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 2:00pm (NO exhibition-only registrations available)



MILCIS 2017
Session Abstracts

Session Abstracts: Day 1 - 14 November 2017

1.1 Breakfast Session—Defence Cloud – Digitally Enabling Defence

 

Presenter: Mr Steve Michelotti, Chief Evangelist – Azure Cloud Engineering, Microsoft

 

Cloud computing plays a critical role in modernisation efforts for both defence organisations and IT departments. Through cloud we can enable forces to exchange battle space objects, common operating picture data, critical events and incidents to enhance collaboration among diverse mission partners and enabling interoperability on the mission network. All the while in a cost efficient and secure environment that can readily adapt to the department’s mission needs without compromising flexibility or choice of operational environment. During this session we will be covering Cognitive Services as well as delivering a several demonstrations and how they have be used in a mission-specific context.

 

 

The Exhibition is open and coffee is available in the Exhibition Hall.

 

1.2 Plenary Session—Opening Session

 

   Welcome: Professor Michael Frater, Rector UNSW Canberra & Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Acting Chief Information Officer, Defence

   Keynote Address: Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Acting Chief Information Officer, Defence

 

1.3  Plenary Session: CIO Session

 

Future CIS Capability

   Keynote Address: AVM Mel Hupfeld, Head Force Design

   Keynote Address: Mr Peter Corcoran, Assistant Secretary ICT Architecture

Operations Support to the Future Force

   Keynote Address: AVM Andrew Dowse, Head ICT Operations Division, CIOG

   Keynote Address: Ms Kathryn Jones, Director Defence Engagement, Telstra

 

1.4  Lunch Session Product Brief: Device Security Challenges for Military and Defense

 

Presented by: Mr Sameer Dixit, Senior Director Security Consulting, Spirent Communications

 

Militaries around the globe leverage devices for communication and intelligence advantages.  Given the diverse usages, communication methods and interconnectivities with other critical systems on the network. Unfortunately, many don’t realize how extensive these deployments actually are—or the attack surface they represent. In fact, IoT deployments have a higher number of security breaches, with costlier consequences, than traditional breaches.

 

This presentation will describe the current state of IoT security, provide insight into attack methods, and identify unique challenges of securing IoT deployments. Attendees will also receive suggested best practices for securing new IoT deployments, increasing system layer security, or enhancing security in overall environment.

 

1.5a Update: Disruption: The Mother of Innovation?

 

Presenter:  Mr Andy Start, President of Inmarsat Global Government

 

Is it possible to truly make an impact without first disrupting the status quo? 

In a world where on-the-move users are subject to constant change in terms of capability needs and requirements, only those who dare to disrupt can ensure that innovative solutions are developed that can support future, and often unforeseen, requirements.

 

Whether in theatre or back at HQ, this paper will explore the multitude of ways that change can be managed, be that on the ground, in the air or at sea. The user experience of the administrator can be just as important as that of the operator when it comes to provisioning and measuring services across many different platforms, in an infinite number of locations across the world. It is these user experiences that can encourage and enhance beneficial change across all these paradigms which lead to greater operational and administrative capabilities.

Government requirements today are driving Inmarsat to develop new systems, technologies and operating principles that support the delivery of disruptive change - through this disruption, comes innovation.

 

1.5b Product Brief: Technology Advancements in SATCOM for Airborne C2 and ISR Networks

 

Presenter:  Mr Jeff Lessner, Sr. Business Development Director, Defense Systems at Hughes

 

Commercial SATCOM technology innovations are delivering new levels of capabilities for end users. This discussion will look at the growing trends and advancements in SATCOM technologies for C2 and ISR network applications.

 

  • SATCOM System SWaP Requirements - Less is More. The advent of high-throughput satellites has enabled development of smaller, lightweight terminals that deliver greater bandwidth efficiency and user flexibility.
  • Open Architecture Systems – Interoperable networks with terminals capable of operating over different frequency bands based on growing global operations.
  • From the ground up - The growing technical trends and technology for current and future Milsatcom network architecture.
  • Delivering on end-user needs – Keeping performance, cost, schedule and risk in mind. Things to consider for C2 and ISR network requirements.

 

1.5c Product Brief: BDATech: Completing the Mission Through Adaptable Communications Platforms

 

Presenter:  Mr Greg Whitehouse, Black Diamond Advanced Technology

 

BDATech provides the dismounted Operator with hardware and software technology to ensure mission success in the rugged conditions and extreme environments in which they must operate. Our customizable kits enable and enhance real and virtual lifelines by integrating with existing fielded equipment such as radios, batteries, and EUDs to maximize the performance and capabilities of the Operator.

 

Our products excel in operations and applications such as joint fires, communications, Explosives Ordinance Disposal (EOD), Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), Signals Intelligence (SIGINT), Close Air Support (CAS) and (DACAS). We provide one hardware solution to support a variety of mission sets and objectives.

 

This presentation will cover:

  • BDATech's approach to designing multi-mission set communications platforms
  • Required flexibility in communication platforms to combat modern threats & requirements
  • Utilizing the correct integrated software programs to ensure mission success.

 

1.6a Product Brief: Tactical Data Center

 

Presenter:  Mr David Huisenga, President and CEO, Klas Telecom Government, Inc

As the amount of data being generated by ISR assets and C4 sensors continues to grow, the ability to rapidly ingest, analyze, and disseminate actionable data in theater becomes increasingly important. The computing and storage resources necessary to store, process and analyze data are traditionally located in a centralized data center. In a tactical or deployed setting, the ability to access these resources is reliant on a robust and secure network path. Military and commercial SATCOM terminals along with embedded route and switch components have been used to facilitate this connectivity. This SATCOM-reliant model challenges an operator’s ability to make decisions based on time and latency sensitive information. Klas Telecom has introduced a modular and scalable architecture for tactical edge computing and data storage. The Tactical Data Center (TDC) solution enables the operator to bring critical applications, services, and data directly to their local operating environment. The resources that traditionally have been constrained to fixed-site data centers can now be deployed in a "tactical friendly" Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) without compromising data center capabilities.

 

The TDC provides a dynamic package with data center grade computing and storage that can fit into a commercial airline overhead compartment. The TDC has been designed to reduce SWaP in every way possible while supporting investments in software applications in use today including Virtual Desktop applications, Microsoft Windows Server, VMware ESXi, NSX and VSAN, and Nutanix Acropolis and Prism to name a few. The TDC is a truly deployable battery backed, global power, rugged, 28.5KG data center with 32 physical cores, 512GB RAM, supporting 8-16 SSDs.

 


1.6b Product Brief: Insight from Network Analytics with Cisco Tetration

 

Presenter:  Mr Aaron Kerr, Consulting Systems Engineer, Cisco Systems

 

The Cisco Tetration Analystics platform addresses data center operational and security challenges by providing behaviour-based application insight, automating policy generation, and enabling zero-trust deployment using application segmentation.

 

By collecting and storing information about every network packet, Cisco Tetration provides effectively time-machine-like analysis, enabling network forensics, application insight and impact assessment of hypothetical changes.

 

1.6c Product Brief: Visibility, Intelligence and Automation with Digital Network Architecture

 

Presenter:  Mr Chris Miles, Chief Architect – Defence, Cisco Systems

 

Cisco Digital Network Architecture (DNA) provides an open, software-driven platform that integrates critical innovations in networking software, such as virtualisation, automation, analytics, and cloud, into one architecture.

 

By automating day-to-day tasks such as configuration, provisioning and troubleshooting, DNA reduces the time it takes to adapt the network, improves issue resolutions and reduces security breach impacts. This results in a significant CapEx and OpEx reduction for the business.

 

1.7a Product Brief:  Building on the ADF’s Pharmaceutical and Medical Supply Process to Deliver a Better Healthcare Service for Members

 

Presenter:  Mr Bruce Moors, Ocean Software

 

PILS has been managing the supply of medical and pharmaceutical items to defence members for over 10 years. Recent upgrades to the PILS platform enhances the ADF’s capabilities to deliver healthcare services to members at home and on deployment.

 

This product briefing will explain what PILS delivers for the Australian Defence Force, and demonstrate how the recent improvements are being used to deliver a better, safer, healthcare service to members.

 

1.7b Product Brief: Extracting a Real-Time Force Readiness Picture from Big Data

 

Presenter: Mr Grant McHerron, Ocean Software

 

Obtaining a reliable force readiness picture is one of the biggest hurdles for any commander. Knowing the current location and readiness state of all assets and personnel can be vital to decision making.

 

Using data contained within existing systems, learn how you can gain an accurate, current force readiness report. This presentation will show you which existing systems capture the information you need and how you can harness that data to generate real time force readiness insight.

 

1.7c Product Brief: Achieving Instant Situational Awareness in Secure Command and Control Environments

 

Presenter:  Mr Joseph Pajer, President & CEO, Thinklogical

 

The proliferation of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) information is radically changing the landscape of the military and intelligence community. Countries are now following a strategy of information superiority to defend against a broad range of threats, whether they be asymmetrical, nuclear or mass armies. A herculean effort has been directed at collecting data through satellites, unmanned vehicles and the monitoring of social media and other information sources.

 

The processing and analysis of this information mostly happens in a secure command and control operations centre, often with joint forces (across branches as well as countries) working together. The number and size of these centres is growing exponentially throughout the world. The current focus of the men and women who design and operate these command centres is “Instant Situational Awareness;” that is, “how can I use the ISR information sources available to me to give me a full and instant picture of the situation?”

 

In this session, you will learn how to:

  • Achieve information superiority and instant situational awareness through and immediate access to critical video and data resources via “any-to-any” switching
  • Simplify management of multiple classifications of information through a single IA (information assurance) approved secure infrastructure
  • Increase the cyber security profile of command and control facilities while mitigating the threat of intentional or accidental breach, hack or data loss by insiders
  • Future-proof your video, audio, and computer signal distribution system to support advances in technology, including 4K resolution and HDR
  • Enable flexible and rapid reconfiguration of command and control resources to quickly adapt to dynamic mission requirements
  • Reduce up-front IT and AV infrastructure expense while lowering long-term total cost of ownership.

 

1.8a Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream

 

Paper 1: A Framework for the Evaluation of the Theoretical Threat Coverage Provided by Intrusion Detection System

Author: G. Creech

Abstract. Intrusion detection systems are a central component of cyber security architecture, and their accuracy is a critical performance metric for any security deployment. Most of the current performance analysis of intrusion detection systems relies on empirical profiling of a given algorithm or implementation against a benchmark dataset. Whilst effective to a point, this traditional evaluation methodology is unable to assess the completeness of threat coverage provided by an intrusion detection system and is consequently a sub-optimal approach if conducted in isolation of other tests. This paper introduces a framework to evaluate the total potential coverage provided by an intrusion detection system as a function of its data sources, extending and complementing the traditional approach.

 

Paper 2: Collaborative Anomaly Detection Framework for Handling Big Data of Cloud Computing

Authors: N. Moustafa, G. Creech, E. Sitnikova, and M. Keshik

Abstract. With the ubiquitous computing of providing services and applications at anywhere and anytime, cloud computing is the best option as it offers flexible and pay-per-use based services to its customers. Nevertheless, security and privacy are the main challenges to its success due to its dynamic and distributed architecture, resulting in generating big data that should be carefully analysed for detecting network's vulnerabilities. In this paper, we propose a Collaborative Anomaly Detection Framework (CADF) for detecting cyber attacks from cloud computing environments. We provide the technical functions and deployment of the framework to illustrate its methodology of implementation and installation. The framework is evaluated on the UNSW-NB15 dataset to check its credibility while deploying it in cloud computing environments. The experimental results showed that this framework can easily handle large-scale systems as its implementation requires only estimating statistical measures from network observations. Moreover, the evaluation performance of the framework outperforms three state-of-the-art techniques in terms of false positive rate and detection rate.

 

1.8b Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream

 

Paper 1: Privacy Preservation Intrusion Detection Technique for SCADA Systems

Authors: M. Keshk, N. Moustafa, E. Sitnikova, and G. Creech

Abstract. Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems face the absence of a protection technique that can beat different types of intrusions and protect the data from disclosure while handling this data using other applications, specifically Intrusion Detection System (IDS). The SCADA system can manage the critical infrastructure of industrial control environments. Protecting sensitive information is a difficult task to achieve in reality with the connection of physical and digital systems. Hence, privacy preservation techniques have become effective in order to protect sensitive/private information and to detect malicious activities, but they are not accurate in terms of error detection, sensitivity percentage of data disclosure. In this paper, we propose a new Privacy Preservation Intrusion Detection (PPID) technique based on the correlation coefficient and Expectation Maximisation (EM) clustering mechanisms for selecting important portions of data and recognizing intrusive events. This technique is evaluated on the power system datasets for multiclass attacks to measure its reliability for detecting suspicious activities. The experimental results outperform three techniques in the above terms, showing the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed technique to be utilized for current SCADA systems.

 

Paper 2: Changing Users' Security Behaviour Towards Security Questions: A Game-based Learning Approach

Authors: N. Micallef and N. Arachchilage

Abstract. Fallback authentication is used to retrieve forgotten passwords. Security questions are one of the main techniques used to conduct fallback authentication. In this paper, we propose a serious game design that uses system-generated security questions with the aim of improving the usability of fallback authentication. For this purpose, we adapted the popular picture-based "4 Pics 1 word" mobile game. This game was selected because of its use of pictures and cues, which previous psychology research found to be crucial to aid memorability. This game asks users to pick the word that relates the given pictures. We then customized this game by adding features which help maximize the following memory retrieval skills: (a) verbal cues - by providing hints with verbal descriptions; (b) spatial cues - by maintaining the same order of pictures; (c) graphical cues—by showing four images for each challenge; (d) interactivity/engaging nature of the game.

 

1.8c Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream

 

Paper 1: Architecture of XMPP Proxy for Server-To-Server Connections

Authors: J. Jarvinen, A. Marttinen, M. Luoma, M. Peuhkuri, and J. Manner

Abstract. The Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) is one of the most popular Instant Messaging (IM) protocols which uses a client-server working mode. This protocol uses different connection primitives for both client-to-server (c2s) and server-to-server (s2s) connections. It is actively used in mission-critical operations where the reliability and security of communication systems is always imperative. One approach to secure services and private networks is to use proxy services as security gateways. Proxies enable interoperability between different security domains acting as Information Exchange Gateways (IEGs). In this paper we present an architecture of the XMPP proxy for s2s connections. The system is based on an Openfire XMPP server with a Hazelcast clustering plugin, and a Hazelcast clustering link is used between the XMPP server and the XMPP Proxy. We have constructed an implementation to verify and validate the presented approach. Our proposal enables an effective seamless connection for XMPP proxies. Furthermore, it increases the system security for example, terminating both TCP and XMPP flows to prevent malicious attacks. Finally, we show that the proposal does not significantly increase the anticipated delay of the communication.

 

Paper 2: Design and Modelling of Energy Efficient WSN Architecture for Tactical Applications

Authors: N. Mohammad, S. Muhammad, A. Bashar, and M. Khan

Abstract. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have a wide variety military applications including battlefield surveillance, enemy tracking, and target classification. In this paper, we propose a WSN architecture based on a mobile sink. The proposed architecture differentiates the regular data from the critical data, and leverages this difference to reduce the energy consumption in WSNs. We formally modelled the mobile and static sink based architectures and analyzed the energy consumption and data delays using a probabilistic model checker.

 

1.9a Refereed Papers—Industry Stream

 

Paper 1: Making the Most of a Consolidated C2 Framework

Author: G. McHerron

Abstract. Unlocking the historical trove of information within C2 systems will allow the savvy operator to apply well chosen metrics to identify trends, determine the impacts of procedural change and perform "what if" analysis to assess potential future changes. Unfortunately, this information remains locked within a system unless staff are able to easily extract the information as and when they require, and in a format to suit their need. This presentation will identify ways to facilitate the extraction of information, provide examples of metrics that can be applied to C2 information and show the resulting benefits of the metric driven analysis.

 

Paper 2: Enabling PNT Assurance at all Threat Levels'

Authors: L. Berry and A. Mebust

Abstract. GPS signals provide Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) data that are needed by virtually every critical military system. Digital radio networks require precise time to operate. Direct and indirect fires systems need precise coordinates to accurately determine firing data. Individual soldiers and vehicles need positioning and navigation data to coordinate offensive and defensive maneuver. Battle management systems require the location of every friendly unit in order to provide commanders with a good understanding of the battlefield. PNT has become a critical element in the ability to shoot, move, and communicate. The most common source of PNT data is GPS. GPS is extremely cost effective, supporting unlimited users through its space based radio broadcasts. And, until recently, GPS has been universally available and has been a very reliable source of PNT. However, recent events have shown several world powers are in the process of re-inventing land warfare. Certain state actors have revealed an advanced ability to disrupt precision navigation and timing capabilities. Our adversaries have increased their levels of sophistication and have attacked existing GPS capabilities with notable skill. Global threats have questioned whether systems relying on PNT will work as expected on the modern battlefield. It is clear that an uninterruptable and reliable source of PNT is essential to the warfighter. It is also clear that solely relying on GPS is not a viable course of action for long term sustainability. Although GPS can be encrypted and the upcoming M-Code signals will be stronger, the inherent vulnerability of a weak, space based, sole source solution remains. Independent sources of PNT must be used for validation of GPS and generation of PNT when GPS is unavailable or untrusted. This capability, known as PNT Assurance provides an uninterrupted flow of reliable Positioning, Navigation, and Timing data. Formidable challenges present themselves in developing a solution that will detect threats to GPS, create accurate PNT in the absence of GPS, and then distribute valid PNT to all clients. It will not be feasible to require replacement of every Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Electronic Warfare (C4ISR/EW) system in a modern vehicle to field a PNT Assurance capability. Ever present budget pressure will require a PNT Assurance solution that is cost effective, scalable, and upgradable. This paper will address the challenge of developing a PNT Assurance capability. We will discuss the drivers and benefits using various sensors such as Chip Scale Atomic Clocks (CSAC), Inertial Navigation Systems (INS), and existing vehicle data sources such as a vehicle Controller Area Network (CAN) Bus to implement and field PNT Assurance. This paper may also serve as a baseline recommendation to the ground vehicle community for bridging the gap between legacy systems deployed today and the C4ISR/EW architectures of the future, via the distribution of valid PNT data across all formats (coaxial, wireless, serial data, Ethernet).

 

1.9b Refereed Papers—Industry Stream

 

Paper 1: A Model for Concept of Operations for ADF Cyber Capabilities—Network Management and Technical Control

Author: C. White

Abstract. This paper presents a model for Concept of Operations for the management and control of ADF Cyber capabilities, specifically in the deployed environment. The model incorporates resolutions to key challenges faced by Army and Airforce with the introduction of numerous complex Cyber capabilities.  Such challenges include, but not limited to: a) integrated management requirements of networks, services and ICT security, b) Officer and NCO cyber roles at all levels of deployed and strategic communication nodes to effectively manage the Cyber capabilities in Army and Airforce operations, c) reduction or elimination of stove pipe cyber management tools,  d) management information overload and determine what management information if important for cyber; and e) what skills the ADF required to discharge new Cyber roles and responsibilities. The model works out management of Cyber capabilities in to both centralised and de-centralised network management in deployed environment.

 

Paper 2: Adapting Long Term Evolution (LTE) / Fifth Generation (5G) Mobile Networks for Military Use

Authors: D. Stapleton, A. McLarty and M. Nichols

Abstract. This paper examines the key issues in adapting current LTE and future 5G networks to military usage. The bandwidth requirements on the modern battlefield are exploding, and heading beyond traditional voice communications to encompass video, imagery and data. One of the more attractive and promising means of resolving the tactical bandwidth requirements for current and future operations is the consideration of 4G LTE (Long Term Evolution) and 5G mobile networks. In fact, 4G LTE networks are already in military service in many countries whereas, 5G networks are gaining credibility as high speed data transmission mediums. The two key features of 5G, being its near-zero latency and data rates of 1–10 Gbps, will change the possibilities for battlefield communications.

Traditional battlefield communications have been constrained to a twofold view of the world; a high speed tactical backbone suitable for intra-headquarters usage and a much lower capacity mobile tactical communications for the deployed land force. Future communications systems will inevitably require low latency and high bandwidth, such as is envisioned for 5G. This will enable a re-think and adaptation of military communications networks towards one generic style node without today’s distinction between high speed backbone and low capacity tactical communications.

 

1.9c Product Brief: The Weaponry of Insight—Fostering Innovation in Defence Operations

 

Presenter: Ms Juliane Gallina, Partner and Director US Federal Solutions

 

Data is a key weapon in the daily battle to keep citizens and nations safe. Join Juliane Gallina, a retired US naval officer and the first woman to serve as the US Naval Academy's brigade commander, and currently a Director IBM's US Federal Solutions, to discuss how technology and innovation can impact operations by augmenting and accelerating human cognition. Explore how you can apply technology in new and disruptive ways to achieve outcomes like improved intelligence, better interaction with the mission space and protecting the health of Defence operations and personnel.

 


Session Abstracts: Day 2 - 15 November 2017

2.1 Breakfast Session: Bringing Innovation to Industry

 

Presenter: Mr Byron Bignoux and Mr Sherard Kueh, NearSat

 

Telstra's innovation incubator Muru-D will provide a real example presentation on how entrepreneurs can commercialise their product to help the wider industry. For this tutorial, we will use the example company of NearSat, as a relatable business to Defence industry.

 

NearSat is bringing satellites down to near-space. Our high altitude, solar-powered drones let you view our world anytime at 9x the resolution of satellites from 20km above. With our unique airframe design and manufacturing technique, we are 50 times cheaper than the current solution. We are launching a constellation of NearSats to tackle the $2 billion satellite imaging market. The founders are aeronautical engineers and have built over 30 aircraft.

 

2.2 Plenary Session: Joint Capability Acquisition

 

    Keynote Address: Mr Paul Cazaz, First Assistant Secretary, ICT Delivery

    Keynote Address: Mr Ivan Zlabur, First Assistant Secretary Joint Systems

 

2.3 Plenary Session: Joint Capability and Information Warfare

 

    Keynote Address: MAJGEN Marcus Thompson, Deputy Chief Information Warfare

    Keynote Address: Dr Tobias Feakin, Ambassador for Cyber Affairs, Department of Foreign Affairs

 

Major General Thompson will discuss the emergent phenomenon and threat of Information Warfare (IW). He will do so from several important angles for the Australian Defence Force (ADF). Firstly, what is the threat from IW that the ADF is facing? Secondly, what is the ADF doing about that threat? Major General Thompson will address some key questions around information-related capabilities described in terms of “warfare” and provide an account of the phrase used to describe the ADF’s activities, that “we do offensive cyber”. Finally, Major General Thompson will discuss the importance of partnership to the information domain, most critically among the ADF and her allies.  Major General Thompson was appointed Head of the Information Warfare Division in Australian Defence Force Headquarters on 01 July 2017. Major General Thompson’s work in this role is foundational to the way the ADF conceives of and will develop its cyber and information-related capabilities.

 

The history of international security and warfare reflects the history of technological innovation. Today, cyberspace is an increasingly important area for cooperation and competition between states. As the strategic significance of cyberspace increases, more groups will try to exert power through it. Likewise, as dependence on global ICT networks increases, the potential costs of disruption are large, and growing. Malicious activity in cyberspace has the potential to threaten international peace, security and stability. A large scale cyber-attack on critical infrastructure would have severe implications for international security. However, international peace, security and stability could be equally threatened by the cumulative effect of repeated low-level malicious online behaviour. It is the scale and effect of the activity, not necessarily the actor, means or method that determine its malicious nature.  Australia is committed to a peaceful and stable cyberspace. We recognise that, as more and more states seek to exert power through cyberspace, there is increased potential for activities in this domain to lead to misperception, miscalculation, escalation and, in the most extreme cases, conflict between states. This presentation will explore the ways in which Australia will look to influence the current international security environment in cyberspace through its international engagement.

 

2.4 Lunch Session Product Brief: Migrate to the Cloud with Confidence

 

Presenter:  Mr Michael Segal, Area VP, Service Assurance, NETSCOUT Systems, Inc

 

Most organizations and agencies are tasked with a “cloud first” initiative for new or expanded services. Many organizations “lift and Shift” while others refactor their applications. Regardless of the approach, you need to know what you’re moving, what is staying behind, and how you’ll be able to continue to deliver the service levels that your customers demand. This session will look at trends in the industry for public cloud service providers, private cloud technologies and the need to provide visibility across the hybrid cloud environment. Russ will also show how NETSCOUT is bringing the value of wire data where that are no wires.

 

2.5a Update: Cyber and State

 

Presenter:  Mr Tom Uren, ASPI

 

The Offensive Cyber Cookbook: Attack and defence in cyberspace and building an Australian offensive cyber capability. We live in an increasingly connected society that relies on the internet for everything from entertainment to communications to supply chains. Everyone carries a computer in their pocket, your child’s teddy bear is now a listening device and your car can be hacked, and maybe your fridge and TV too. The current consensus is that cybersecurity is, on average, terrible and that in cyberspace attack has a natural advantage over defence. From these presumptions it flows that investment in offensive cyber capabilities will provide us with an asymmetric military advantage.  I will argue, however, that cybersecurity is improving and that there is no natural advantage of attack over defence. What does this mean for building an Australian Offensive Cyber capability? I present ideas for prioritising work on offensive capabilities.

 

Presenter:  Dr Gareth Parker, DSTG Research Leader, Cyber Sensing and Shaping

 

Cyber security has pervasive impact on everyone.  The community is starting to get the message that the stakes are high for individuals, corporations and government alike.  The message has been underpinned by high level government leadership, including the 2016 release of Australia’s cyber security strategy, establishment of the Australian Cyber Security Centre, the Australian Cyber Security Growth Network and cyber having been given strong prominence in the 2016 Defence White Paper.  But in Defence, the impact of cyber vulnerability is arguably at another level altogether.  Whilst we all have priorities on data availability, integrity and confidentiality, these needs tend to be of concurrently high priority within Defence.  A system reboot can cause a costly delay to a front-line force, erroneous or misleading data can lead to poor decisions, and compromise of sensitive information could allow an adversary a decisive edge.  Further complicating things for Defence is that the cyber threat must be considered in conjunction with other threats – including electronic warfare, chemical and biological, and kinetic.  And within Defence, we must deal with systems of high complexity, that age rapidly and for which sustainment can be very slow.  These characteristics are the very opposite of those necessary for high confidence cyber security.  This presentation explores these issues and poses thoughts towards a solution approach.

 

2.5b Update: Big Data—Risk and Resilience

 

Presenter:  Mr Berin Lautenbach, Chief Security Officer, Testra

 

Terabytes, petabytes, exabytes, zettabytes, yottabytes… we can get lost in data. Let Berin Lautenbach, Telstra’s Chief Information Security Officer, Asia Pacific, navigate a path through big data and share his perspective gleaned from over 25 years in cyber security. Berin will explore the risks and where we need to focus to build resilience as we work to protect data – whether big or small.

 

Update: Big Data—Data Mining

 

Presenter:  Dr Brenton Cooper, Data to Decisions Cooperative Research Centre

 

Extremist messaging is pervasive. Recent studies show that ISIS and its affiliated media organisations are more prolific marketers than well-known brands like Pepsi and Coke. How can we understand who is engaging with this message? Who is at the heart of a cyber influence campaign? This presentation will detail how data analytics and deep learning techniques can be exploited to understand cyber influence.

 

2.5c Update:  Analytics for Defense from C4ISR to Health

 

Presenter:  Dr Ryan Weil, Principal Data Scientist, Leidos

 

With machine learning expected to be the third offset, data has become the new “must have” munition for the world's militaries. As with many unconventional or new munitions/weapons systems, data and the analytics it supports have high learning curve, but amazing potential as a force multiplier when used correctly.  We will discuss how a well-designed analytics solution can support many key defense missions from traditional battle field decision support and autonomy in unmanned vehicles to support functionality like logistics operations, unit readiness and individual health and performance. There is no one size fits all solution, but by recognizing the commonalities between missions, data and end goals, the number of analytics systems required is reduced, without compromising mission support. The data that is of interest is often not what is commonly classed as big data since it is large, “peak-y” or simply ungainly and difficult to use/fuse. Using use cases selected from many low side or non-defense applications, we will explore how a common and reusable analytic system can built and shared across mission spaces and add value beyond the cost savings and reduction in system complexity. (i.e. Cross training personnel regardless of specialty and opportunities to share and propagate institutional knowledge are a force multiplier and improve sustainability in a high personnel turnover environment.) How the application of simple analytics techniques can have a substantial impact and provide a beach head for larger follow on transformation efforts.  As well as common pitfalls in the agile creation analytics solutions and how to avoid them. Finally we will examine key but often unappreciated concepts such visualization, user experience and "good enough" results given the amount of time available.

 

2.6a  Update: Joint Force Headquarters

 

Presenter:  COL Wade Johnson

 

 

2.6b  Product Brief: Observe. Orient. Decide. Act. Gaining Insight from Unstructured Data to Accelerate the Decision Cycle

 

Presenter:  Mr Rafael Jozwial, Director (Oceania), Jane’s by IHS Markit & Mr Savid Waxman, Global Chief Architect, IBM

 

With today's operational tempo, modern Defence Forces are subject to rapidly increasing volumes of information. This information may be generated by a Defence Enterprise’s own sensors and collectors, come from third parties, or be the result of OSINT collection.  More and more of this information is an "unstructured format."  It can come in the form of tactical intelligence reports, finished intelligence products, commercial intelligence sources, as well as open source news services and social media content.

 

All of this information is relevant to supporting the making of decisions within the Enterprise at various levels.  The unstructured format of this data poses new challenges for quickly and accurately determining the context of what is being conveyed and the relationships that exist across these datasets, which can cover years of content from a variety of sources.

 

This briefing will discuss and demonstrate key functionality required to rapidly ingest, extract, correlate, enrich and analyse multiple sources of data, enabling an improved level of situational awareness in support of the decision cycle.  The approach supports an iterative path to capability development, starting by using the information and processes already available.

 

2.6c Tutorial:  Building Multi Level Security Environments

 

Presenter:  Mr Daniel Lai, CEO, archTIS

 

Attribute-based access control (ABAC) can be used to grant access to systems, workspaces, content and functionality based on each individual’s set of user attributes (e.g. nationality, organisation, security clearance, workspace ownership, file/folder ownership, usergroup membership, system role, location, network, device, session and viewing/editing rights). This approach enables complex organisations to apply information security and sharing policies that control a user’s access.

 

When ABAC is combined with a Cross Domain Solution it enables the goal of Multi Level Security whereby users of different classifications, from networks of different classifications can access data of different classifications, all within a single virtual information sharing environment.

 

The Tutorial will cover the principles, capabilities and application of ABAC, as well as the principles and capabilities of Cross Domain Solutions, and how they can be coupled together to achieve secure cross domain and cross agency information sharing.

 

2.7a Tutorial:  Implementing an EIM Strategy on SharePoint Frequently Fails in Organizations like Defence – Why? – And Understand how to Succeed!

 

Presenters:  Mr Perry Smith, Director & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies

 

Often, the theory of EIM drives how people try to implement it in practice. We suggest that the practice and reality (i.e. what can be done with the apps and technology) should drive the practical implementation of EIM and simply aligned back to the theory.

 

In this tutorial, we will explore where and how SharePoint plays a pivotal role in EIM. Further, we will show how EIM based on a SharePoint implementation can be designed and implemented to succeed, avoiding the pitfalls of trying to implement EIM in a federated operating environment.

 

The tutorial will explain and demonstrate the challenges, and how they can (and have been) overcome and is for Information managers (Navy, Army and Air Force), SharePoint administrators and IT strategists.

 

2.7b Tutorial: Highly Secure SharePoint - Including Cross Domain

 

Presenters:  Mr Perry Smith, Director & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies

 

SharePoint is implemented in defence to support a number services, including SC2S. Security sits at the heart of managing defence information and making certain that the right people have the right access to information.

 

SharePoint traditional security will not support the required security within the defence needs. This session will show how full attribute-based access control (ABAC) can be supported within a SharePoint environment to fully support Classification, Releasability and Caveat management.

 

We will also demonstrate how highly secure cross-domain information transfers can be done for all SharePoint information.

 

2.7c Tutorial: Cradle to Grave Information Management - for the Warfighter

 

Presenters:  Mr Perry Smith, Director & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies

 

Does the warfighter really need the added burden of managing information? We say they have enough to do managing their present circumstances and day-to-day business. However, as an organization, there is still a very real requirement to be able to manage the full life cycle of information. So a report and return is authored, changed, approved, released and acted upon. How does that process then integrate back to the rest of the organization for records, reporting and other compliance requirements?

 

In this tutorial we will explore some of the specific challenges of the defence environment and how the process can be made significantly easier with smart use of the technology.

 

2.8a Product Brief:  Real World Examples on how the US Navy Leverages Data to Perform Condition Based Maintenance

 

Presenter:  Mr Ben Davis, Teradata

 

The US Navy air fleet is a large and complex fleet of aircraft that must meet the operational needs of the largest Naval fleet in the world. With a budget in the billions just for the air fleet alone, the US Navy are required to find innovative methods to maintain their fleet of aircraft over an expanded operational global footprint without increasing the budget. Whilst the Navy has been good at generating data, they never really used the data for decision making. In this session you will see how the Navy leveraged data and analytics to generate improvements in their V-22 and H-60 fleet. 

 

2.8b Update:  Australia's Communication Capabilities Available on ViaSat-3, a Global Ka-band Satellite Constellation

 

Presenter:  Mr Craig Miller, Vice President, Chief Technology Officer, Government Systems, ViaSat Inc.

 

This update describes the communications capabilities available on the ViaSat-3 global Ka-band satellite constellation and its relevance to Australia.

 

The ViaSat-3 constellation continues the economic leadership of ViaSat network capacity, along with unparalleled performance, mission assurance, and security in benign and contested environments. In 2021, each ViaSat-3 satellite will transport well over 1 Tbps (1,000 Gbps) of data, the 3-satellite constellation will provide 65°N to 65°S global coverage, with over 4.5Tbps of data in a single global network, with many more satellites to follow. This network provides broadband operations for terrestrial, maritime, airborne and even orbital communications platforms. The uniquely flexible ViaSat-3 system allows real-time redistribution of capacity in response mission and market needs: dynamically allocated capacity can be spread globally across widely distributed regions or concentrated to bring massive amounts of surge capacity to multiple demanding regional hot-spots.

 

The network is highly resistant to interference, significantly outperforming all current and planned milsatcom capabilities, including AEHF and WGS, in electromagnetically contested and nuclear scintillated environments. The highly distributed and redundant nature of the gateway links eliminates disrupting (or intercepting) the satellite-to-gateway communications. Additionally, the ViaSat-3 network can geolocate interference sources in real time.

 

The ViaSat-3 network provides real-time situational awareness down to individual user device traffic flows. This end-point situational awareness enables an integrated, automated intelligent cyber defense that protects the network and its users, with response to threats implemented in machine time.

 

The network continues the low price leadership, which currently delivers capacity at 1/30th of the milsatcom networks.

 

2.8c Update:  Defence Spectrum Update

 

Presenter:  Mr David Murray, Department of Defence

 

The Defence Spectrum Office will provide an update on developments in Defence spectrum management and the Australian spectrum regulatory framework. Spectrum is an important defence and national resource that is facing ever increasing demand from Defence and other government users and in particular from the commercial sector. Spectrum is a fundamental requirement for Defence communications, command and control, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and electronic warfare systems. As Defence capability undergoes significant modernisation and new capabilities such as the E/A-18 Growler come into service, effective management of the radiofrequency spectrum is critical - both in the domestic peacetime context and on operations. As the ADF modernises its spectrum capabilities there is a need for the development of concepts to manage the convergence between spectrum management, electronic warfare and cyberspace operations.

 

2.9a Update: CBM-400: Multi-Mission Modem and Flexible Waveform

 

Presenter:  Mr Andy Lincoln, Chief Technical Officer, Tactical Network Solutions, ViaSat Inc.

 

MILSATCOM is in the midst of dramatic changes in multiple dimensions, including: greater use of HD and 4k video, increased use of airborne SATCOM for en-route mission planning and ISR, emphasis on joint services and coalition operations, planning for WGS follow-on satellites, and the integration of next-generation satellites from O3b, ViaSat, and Inmarsat. At the same time, warfighters at the tactical edge need lighter, more capable, more flexible SATCOM equipment to achieve mission goals in light of and in spite of these changes to the SATCOM architecture.

 

This CBM-400 product update explains ViaSat’s approach to meeting warfighter needs during the coming multi-year transition. The CBM-400 is a Multi-Mission Modem that supports many of today’s warfighter-relevant waveforms and networks over WGS and traditional COMSATCOM. CBM-400 also supports operations over 03b and serves as the base design for ViaSat’s PTW modem. Additionally, ViaSat is adding support to CBM-400 for ViaSat’s next-generation high capacity satellites and addressing networking considerations to make the transition easier to manage by the tactical warfighter.

 

This presentation discusses lessons learned in previous transitions, the challenges and successes of Software Defined Radios (SDRs), and network operator considerations such as simulcasting, interoperability and backward compatibility. For example, we will discuss when it’s best to put flexibility at the edge vs. the anchor station and also ViaSat’s support of previous DoD efforts with SATCOM SDRs. Through this presentation, we will recommend relevant and practical strategies for delivering new capabilities to the warfighter in the midst of dramatic changes in the MILSATCOM ecosystem.

 

2.9b Update:  How an ISP Fights the Bad Guys with Integrated Cybersecurity Technology and a Cyber Resilient Network Architecture

 

Presenter:  Mr Jon Korecki, Executive Director, Strategic Initiatives Cyber Security and Information Assurance, ViaSat Inc.

 

ViaSat is a global internet broadband service provider that serves more than 1,000,000 customers worldwide on land, sea and over the air. Our customers range from Consumer, Enterprise, Government and Military. ViaSat has developed an integrated cybersecurity system and on-going strategy to combat the cyber adversary to insure our business case and provide our customers with reliable and resilient service. In this presentation, ViaSat will discuss key approaches and measures on how we defend our global network and systems through the use of threat models, continuous monitoring, big data analytics, orchestration and SOC operations, as well as the latest threat vectors from IoT that are facing our users and ISP network.

 

2.9c Update:  Honey, I Hacked The SCADA! : Industrial CONTROLLED Systems

 

Presenter:  Mr Jon Korecki, Executive Director, Strategic Initiatives Cyber Security and Information Assurance, ViaSat Inc.

 

This session will identify and analyze real attacks targeting (ICS) Industrial Control Systems. Strategically placed network sensors, with intentional vulnerabilities, were set up serving as ICS “HoneyNets.” The goal was to solicit attacks, so those activities and methods could be analyzed and correlated. The attack data substantiates that some attacks are random in nature, while others indicate that reconnaissance was used to gather initial information to launch more sophisticated attacks at a later date, involving multiple actors and multiple machines. The data we collected and processed established attacker profiles by geolocation, level of sophistication, determination, and intent specific to SCADA control devices representing a subset of an electric utility control network. The attack data, was graded and then stored for comparative analysis and will be presented here in this informative session. This data provides real threat intelligence with attacker profiling of persistent threats against the nation’s critical infrastructure. HoneyNet architecture and deployment techniques and considerations will be addressed as well as optimization and integration into other Cyber Security solutions.

 


Session Abstracts: Day 3 - 16 November 2017

3.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: Maximising the Effectiveness of National Defence Forces through Disruptive Technology

Presenter: Mr Andrew Carwardine, Managing Director, Dynama Global

Defence forces must be adaptable and responsive with the ability to shift emphasis rapidly between prevention, deterrence, protection and intervention. The nature of contemporary conflict and the increasingly complex demands placed upon the military, will continue to place a premium on the efficient management and swift exploitation of information which is more often than not siloed and inaccessible.

 

The delivery of military capability broadly follows a five-point process: define, plan, generate, employ and evaluate. The process is continuous and relies on data from a variety of sources to ensure the successful use of land, sea, air and joint forces. Dynama OneView is designed to support the processes that deliver military capability by optimising force structures and preparing and generating forces for deployment through the aggregation of the fundamental Inputs to Capability.

 

Interested to learn more? Register to attend Dynama’s breakfast session where Andrew Carwardine, Managing Director of Dynama, will be talking about how to maximise the effectiveness of National Defence Forces through disruptive technology, to accelerate planning and timely decision-making.

 

3.2 Plenary Session: One Defence

 

3.3a SecureCanberra Plenary Session

 

Welcome Address: Chuan-Wei Hoo, Technical Advisor, Asia-Pacific, (ISC)², Chief CyberSecurity Technology Officer, ST Electronics (Info-Security) Pte Ltd.

Presentation: Have You Got 1 Second? Securing the Enterprise in a High Data Velocity & Variety World

Presenter: Mr Stephen Kho, Managing Principal, Cyber Security Services, Micro Focus

A second may not be a long time but in the new high data velocity world of Internet of Things (IoT) & Smart world, 1 second can represent hundreds of thousands of events flying past your security analyst.

 

A highly scalable & intelligent routing capability is key to ingesting high velocity data in today’s SOC. Real-time events correlation integrated with advanced analytics is a must in order to detect today’s advanced, multi-stage attacks that may only appear as a single event and harmless.

 

In this presentation, we will provide information on industry trend towards a flexible N:M architecture for the intelligent SOC. We will also provide examples of use cases to show how cyber hunting, analytics & visualizations is used to detect previously “unknown” attacks and how this is reshaping the composition & skill sets required in an effective enterprise SOC.

 

3.3b SecureCanberra

 

Presentation: Cyber Skilling for a Secure Australia

Presenter: Professor Jill Slay, Director, Australian Centre for Cyber Security, University of New South Wales;

Asia-Pacific Advisory Council, (ISC)²

 

3.3c Lunch Session Product Brief: Making Big Data Smart

Presenter: Mr Michael Segal, Area VP, Service Assurance, NETSCOUT Systems, Inc

Big Data has become a topic that is unavoidable. There is no doubt that a wealth of information can be found in all the devices that are connected to our networks, but what about the communications between devices on the network? Many organizations have tried to capture traffic and store it for later analysis, but finding useful information can often be like looking for a “needle in a haystack”. In this session, Russ will discuss the trends in big data as it applies to IT and unfold how NETSCOUT has been able to transform wire data into “Smart Data” that can optimize your big data initiatives.

 

3.3d SecureCanberra

 

Presentation: "An Apple a Day" is Truer than Ever: Basic Security Steps are Highly Effective but Most Often Overlooked

 

Presenter: Mr Michael Aboltins, Field Technical Product Manager – APAC, Tenable

 

Michael will discuss how effective security is in the basics, highlighting lessons to learn from common IT security errors. He will also cover how to communicate security requirements to the board and prioritise action to optimise your security program.

 

3.3e SecureCanberra

 

Presentation: Understanding the Threat

 

Presenter: Mr Edward Farrell, Director, Mercury ISS

 

In the pursuit for cybersecurity and all things defensive we have a habit of overlooking the 'why' of cybersecurity. Understanding threats is a task that is often paid off or misconstrued because we as cybersecurity professionals tend to have an inward focus of the task at hand. The purpose of this talk is to reinvigorate the audience’s appreciation of the threats facing the modern environment. This talk will extend its reach into the technology and environments encountered by MilCIS as well as a holistic view of security from a digital, physical and social domains.

 

3.3f SecureCanberra

 

Presentation: What will Next Generation Information Security be Like?

 

Presenter: Mr Chuan-Wei Hoo, Chief Cybersecurity Technology Officer, ST Electronics Info-Security; Technical Advisor, Asia-Pacific, (ISC)²

 

 

3.4a Update: The Path to Achieving Australian GVA—Hawkei ICS is Just the First Step

 

Presenters: Mr Steven Welsh, CASG, Mr Peter Whalley, LEA, and TBA, LNIC

 

At MILCIS 2016, a pair of related briefs were given by LEA and Land 121 Ph4. These briefs outlined the plans to release a standardised vehicle specification, and an update on the UK GVA based Hawkei ICS.

 

In 2017, this presentation will provide an update on the progress of Hawkei ICS, the DEF(AUST) 11297 and Army’s approach to managing AS GVA and the Land Data Model.

 

Hawkei ICS is the most ambitious step by the ADF to integrate a multi-functional computer into a large land vehicle fleet. ICS seeks to provide Open Standards and support multiple tactical applications to reduce SWaP-C2. The development of ICS has largely been a success, from concept through to initial stages of the capability. The range of tactical applications is expected to grow, as other ADF projects seek the utility of the vehicle and ICS.

 

DEF(AUST) 11297 is the evolving vehicle standard being developed by LEA to encapsulate tactical C4 requirements for the ADF into the future. It seeks to define a common set of requirements, which can be consistently applied to future vehicle acquisitions. DEF(AUST) 11297 is a key enabler to the implementation of AS GVA within Army.

 

Throughout 2017, LNIC has been developing the Army policy for AS GVA. This process has involved extensive consultation with the UK, Australian Industry and related ADF vehicle projects. The AS GVA policy will provide the guidance framework, and describe how the AS GVA Land Data Model will be managed and controlled.

 

3.4b Update: Australian GVA Land Data Model (LDM) Development

 

Presenter: Mr Sibi Ravindran, LNIC

 

This session will provide an introduction and overview of the Australian Land Data Model (LDM). The session will outline the various components of the LDM, and how industry, particularly Australian start-ups and SMEs, can develop applications for current and future Land platforms for Australian Army. A number of solution use cases will be presented on the benefits of the LDM, and finally the future plans for standardisation, governance and evolution of LDM will be discussed.

 

3.4d Update: An Overview of Place in the Network (PINs) Reference Architecture for the Defence Fixed Strategic and Deployed Environments

 

Presenter: Mr Angelo Puglielli, Solutions Architect, Cisco Systems

 

This session explores two key goals (business alignment and usability) of enterprise architecture products and how the Defence PINs communications reference architecture has addressed these.

 

The PINs reference architecture framework has established an effective conceptual architecture for representing the network service and infrastructure patterns and services across the varied domains within the Defence Information Environment. The PINs architecture framework is Defence-owned, vendor-agnostic and AMRB endorsed. PINs defines the large and complex Defence environment into a set of logical domains such as Deployed Land, Mobile Tactical, Maritime, Air and Fixed Strategic.

 

3.4e Tutorial: Simulation Modelling for Design of Battlespace Communications System (Land) Networks

Presenters: Dr Matthew Britton, Dr Andrew Coyle, Dr Bruce Northcote, University of Adelaide

The Land 2072 Prime System Integrator (PSI) is developing the Battlefield Communication System (Land) (BCS(L)) network reference design. The PSI will use this reference design to guide current and future tactical and deployable communications acquisition projects. The Centre for Network Communication and Information Networking (CDCIN) has developed a network modelling and simulation environment called PABLO to test, exercise, and verify the developing BCS(L) reference design in realistic deployed scenarios—including models of heterogeneous networks from different vendors, sensors and RF equipment across bearers such as satellite, terrestrial microwave, fibre, tactical radio and LTE cellular. PABLO simulates individual elements use to form BCS(L) networks such as communications links, routers, switches and gateways; then applies realistic traffic profiles including voice, video and traditional data transfers such as file transfers and email exchanges. A key aspect of the capability is identifying and determining the effect of failure modes of the network due to changes in load, topology, equipment or configuration. Traffic performance statistics are captured such as load, loss, throughput, grade of service and delay. The resultant performance analysis can be used to inform, guide and verify through various stages of the BCS(L) design.

 

3.4f Update: Theory Meets Reality: Challenges and Solutions for Deploying MANET in Real Tactical Environments

 

Presenter: Mr Haidong Wang, Vice President of Product Management, TrellisWare Technologies

 

MANET technology had promised great benefits for enabling Network Centric Warfare (NCW): easy to use self-forming self-healing network, simultaneous voice and data traffic, and ubiquitous connectivity for every soldier on the move. However, when deploying traditional MANET in real tactical environments, many of those benefits were not realized. When facing the challenging conditions of real tactical environments, such as limited spectrum, high mobility, and harsh RF environments, traditional MANET technologies exhibited severe shortcomings: poor scalability, low capacity, high spectrum usage, low Message Completion Rate (MCR), and high complexity.

 

This update first performs an in-depth analysis of the fundamental reasons behind those challenges, and then provides an update on an alternative, counter-intuitive approach to MANET that addresses those issues at a fundamental level. The foundation of traditional MANET is topology control: a networking algorithm that learns the changes of network topology and then adapts to those changes. This is a form of closed-loop control system, in which learning and adapting requires knowledge exchange, therefore bandwidth and time. Faster change and more network nodes require higher bandwidth. A network’s adaptation capacity is limited by bandwidth available for topology control. Real tactical environments change rapidly, exceeding the capacity of adaptation, and causing the issues listed above. Barrage Relay networking, an efficient flooding network system developed by TrellisWare, requires no topology control, and can deliver 200-node per channel scalability, reliable delivery, and instantaneous adaptation. Barrage Relay is the core of the TSM waveform, the MANET selected for USSOCOM next generation tactical radios

 

3.5a Update: Joint C4—Joint Command and Control

 

Presenters: BRIG Rose Vivian, COL Dan Hartigan, JC4 Branch, IW Division

 

Under the First Principles Review, Defence is now managing its IIP projects in Programs and Streams. The creation of the C4I Program within the ISREW Space and Cyber Stream has fundamentally changed how Defence will manage its Command and Control capabilities. The C4I Program Sponsor will provide an update on what these changes are and what opportunities exist in this new Capability Management construct.

 

3.5b Update: Joint C4—Joint Communications

 

Presenters: BRIG Rose Vivian, COL Dan Hartigan, JC4 Branch, IW Division

 

Under the First Principles Review, Defence is now managing its IIP projects in Programs and Streams. The creation of the C4I Program within the ISREW Space and Cyber Stream has fundamentally changed how Defence will manage its Command and Control capabilities. Within the C4ISR program the Joint C2 sub-program has been established to be the Capability Manager for: Joint Data Networks, Joint Decision Support and Joint ICT Interoperability. The Joint C2 sub-Program Sponsor will provide an update on what these changes are and what opportunities exist in this new Capability Management construct.

 

3.5d

 

Not presented.

 

3.5e Update: Airborne Networking in a Coalition Environment

 

Presenter: Mr Keith Smith, Technical Fellow, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems

Today’s warfighters require ever increasing amounts of data in order to maintain their operational and combat effectiveness against peer and near peer threats. Through access to commercial networks, they are accustomed to high rate data on demand, even while deployed to remote regions that may lack robust military communications infrastructure. To help meet the demand for secure military grade communications, users have turned to airborne networking to solve the problems of dissimilar waveform bridging, range extension, and Beyond Line Of Sight (BLOS) connectivity.

 

Each military force has defined their own version of airborne networking to suit their specific mission and deployment requirements. For example, in 2008, US CENTCOM defined a Joint Urgent Operational Need (JUON) to deploy the E-11A and EQ-4B to the Middle East to help resolve the problem of ground and airborne communications in very difficult terrain. Based on those lessons learned and future requirements, the US Department of Defense defined the Joint Aerial Layer Network (JALN) in 2011 and the Royal Australian Air Force developed Plan Jericho, which demonstrated joint operations in exercises in early 2016. Recently the United Kingdom Royal Air Force has begun to explore requirements for a Future Integrated Battlespace that includes aerial layer communications.

 

This Update presentation will explore and identify critical technologies associated with developing and deploying airborne networks and gateways to support current and future military operations. The presentation will include a review of future tactical networks and how gateways can be leveraged to improve collaboration between coalition forces.

 

3.5f Update: 2017 LNIC Trials and Initiatives

 

Presenters: MAJ Steve Markham and Dr Peter Holliday, LNIC

 

This session will provide an overview of LNIC trials and focus areas over the last 12 months, including major projects planned for 2018. Key topics will include the Defensive Cyberspace Operations trial during Exercise TALISMAN SABRE 2017, Tactical Communications Network data logging and analysis, Army's Tactical and Operational networks integration and Coalition Common Operating Picture (COP) integration.

 

3.6a Product Brief: Why Doesn't SharePoint Properly Support the Conduct of Operations for the Warfighter, and How Can This be Changed?

 

Presenters: Mr Perry Smith & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies

 

When Microsoft developers created SharePoint, they set out to solve the problem of allowing people internal to Microsoft to collaborate. From this original product – STS – SharePoint Team Services, SharePoint in its various guises evolved. The central tenant was a centralised SharePoint farm for a corporate operation. From a design perspective, SharePoint was not designed to support military operations.

 

This tutorial will walk you through the S2IX platform. S2IX utilises SharePoint, and is specifically designed to support mission planning, mission execution and the various functions and staffing that are required. This includes the relevant operation conditions (federated), environment (variable bearer systems and often offline), security (information and data), and the warfighter tools, apps and information required.

 

3.6b Tutorial: Open System Architecture Approach for Maritime Communications and Information Systems

 

Presenter: Mr Arthur Ollett, Naval Communications System Technical Expert, Thales Australia

 

Today’s Warfighter is required to make tactical decisions based on real-time access to information about the battlespace. Information warfare has evolved as both the technology and the battlespace has evolved to the point that effective C4ISR is critical to the success of the Warfighter. Increasing the speed of command by delivering the right information to the Warfighter at the right time to the right place in order to make the right decision. The RAN is working in an increasingly complex maritime environment that demands more agility and challenges how the service both develops and defends its warfighting systems. C4I has provided the RAN with an asymmetric advantage over the years, but this is changing with information warfare, the RAN need to take advantage of new technology quickly and it must be easy to use. Engineers must strive to reduce the complexity of systems for end users. Defence and industry need to stop thinking about building large monolithic brittle systems. We need to start thinking about building smaller applications, systems and widgets that allow to plug other applications and widgets together an “Open Architecture” is paramount to future success. The data must move very quickly across the network in order to put a weapon or sensor on the target. Applications and widgets can and “must” be put together to help move data quickly. Interoperability happens through driving specifications and standards, providing APIs (application programming interfaces) and being more rigid in how systems are developed. The challenge in C4I is how to drive enterprise level set of services, and how to build and sustain them Industry need to start with the end in mind and work their way back from there.

 

The tutorial we are seeking to present will address how these challenges can potentially be addressed in the Maritime environment.

 

3.6d Tutorial: The Importance of the Information Exchange Requirement (IER) Capture Process

 

Presenter: Mr David Abel, Director, LUMINACT Pty Ltd

 

Information Exchange has never been more important to the war fighter. Today we struggle with the sheer magnitude of data collected and how to take full advantage. Information Exchange Requirements (IER) and how they are derived is the initial key step to establish what information is both needed and/ or available. Defining your IERs in isolation without a common capture process nor adherence to strict governance will ultimately lead to lack of interoperability as well as knowledge deprivation. This tutorial is targeted at those who are responsible for platform information exchange as well as platform information exchange capability as well as other interested stakeholders. The content is structured to walk the individual through the basic steps and overarching governance to ensure that different IER capture process workshops collect information requirements that have a common alignment to a central process model allowing full cross platform integration.

 

3.6e Update: Joint Project 9101—Enhanced Defence High Frequency Communications System (EDHFCS)

 

Presenter: LTCOL James Brownlie, JP9101

 

An objective of PROJECT PHOENIX is to conceive, develop, acquire and sustain a technically enhanced long range high frequency communications capability to meet the needs of Government. The purpose of the presentation is to broaden Project engagement and provide interested parties an overview of the project. The presentation will take a thematic approach to contextualise and enhance awareness of the key issues. The topic areas to be addressed are:

 

  • Capability requirements and indicative scope.
  • Existing system.
  • Project Structures: Joint Capability Group and Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group.
  • Project milestones and key activities.
  • Risk mitigation activities and lessons learnt.
  • Industry Engagement.

 

This presentation will provide essential information to those members of government, academia, and defence industry who intend to contribute to the future direction of high frequency communications.

 

3.6f Workshop: Joint Project 9101—Project Phoenix

 

Presenter: LTCOL James Brownlie, JP9101

 

The ADF has identified a real need for future operations to be fought in a Satellite Denied, Degraded, Intermittent and Low Bandwidth (D-DIL) environments. In these Satellite D-DIL operations, the ADF will look to HF systems to enable long range communications between Australian and deployed assets. Over recent years the ADF, among the rest of the world, has become reliant on high bandwidth, constant connection, Internet Protocol (IP) information over Satellite bearers, and therefore a shift to small data size, higher data loss operations will result in a clear change in operating procedures for the ADF. The current 3 khz channels will be unable to support most IP communications, and therefore a move from the ITU allocated Narrowband frequency allocations to Wideband allocations of 24khz or greater is required. However, the current HF allocations were made in the days of analogue voice and military message over serial data whilst today’s militaries require a variety of information types, including small and large size IP traffic to be trafficked, even up to real time Full Motion Video (FMV). Radio manufacturers are no longer producing NB radios, and WB 24 khz radios will be the norm—however users of these radios are unable to take advantage of the capability that these will provide until the ITU changes HF allocations.

 

The ADF is proposing to be the first user group to approach the ITU to review worldwide HF allocations. Is industry willing to co-sponsor our approach? What should Project Phoenix consider when writing an FPS to support IP information exchange over HF?

 

3.7a Tutorial: Reference Frames, Coordinates, and Units: How to Use Them Without Tears

 

Presenter: Dr Don Koks, DSTG

 

Analysing scenarios that involve interacting entities requires an ability to switch reference frames and coordinate systems with ease. Examples are: working with GNSS satellite orbits, aiming a radar at a moving object, and relating the world seen from one manoeuvring aircraft to the world seen by another manoeuvring aircraft.

 

This is the bane of many researchers and programmers, who can find themselves sinking in a sea of vectors, matrices, quaternions, and obscure notation that might be expressed in a jumble of different measurement units. Practitioners must often resort to ad-hoc fixes, such as the famous method of "just keep swapping matrices and changing things until it works".

 

In this tutorial I'll show you a structured approach to this subject. We'll begin by exploring how to deal easily with different measurement units; discuss the difference between reference frames and coordinate systems--and why you should know it; learn the crucial difference between a vector and its coordinate representation, and what that means for a scenario that is evolving; how to quantify spatial orientation, and how to relate any number of different frames and coordinates methodically. Hopefully, you will walk away with a new-found ability to disentangle any scenario described by multiple entities.

 

3.7b Product Brief: Cognitive AI for National Defence & Intelligence

 

Presenter: Mr Steve Michelotti, Chief Evangelist– Azure Cloud Engineering, Microsoft

 

Command and control solutions enable situational awareness, common operational picture and communications on the battlefield extending capabilities in the air, on the ground, underwater and in cyberspace. These solutions provide the commander with the information to make effective decisions and provides troops, officers, and commanders the capability to access the information necessary to complete their mission.

In this briefing we will cover the following:

  • Cognitive Services – Face detection and identification/recognition, computer vision (i.e., object recognition), speaker recognition, translation, sentiment analysis and keyword extraction
  • Azure Media Analytics – which includes motion and face detection and speech-to-text.
  • Custom Vision Service – showcasing scenarios demonstrating how agencies can train their own custom objects.
  • Cognitive Toolkit – the most advanced custom object detection with real-time video analytics.

 

3.7d Product Brief: A New Era of Gigabit SATCOM Capability

 

Presenter: Mr Glen Tindall, SES Networks

 

How would your CONOPS change if you had access to 100Mbps communication links from assets in the land, sea and air domains? This presentation provides an overview of recent real-life government applications utilizing secure, ubiquitous, high speed, low latency MEO satellite communications.

 

3.7e Update: 2017 Military CIS Workforce, Supply & Demand, Risks & Opportunities

 

Presenter: Mr Robert Kremer, Director, Kinexus

 

With $195 billion being invested in defence capability over the next decade, the defence sector will be required to grow significantly. After contracting to around 23,000 people in 2015, the defence industry will need to expand by around 30% over the next 5-8 years. Constrained access to workers contributed to the project delays experienced in the late 2000’s, and if not carefully managed now, may do so again.

 

Kinexus’ recently released its Defence Insights report, containing comprehensive data relating to industry demand, salary levels, worker demographics and attraction and retention factors. Insights have been drawn from proprietary tools and systems, as well as from unique access to senior leaders and planners in the sector.

 

The below data and insights will be reviewed and analysed, with a focus on CIS projects and workforce.

  • Project Environment: The current defence sector project environment, along with analysis on the impact of adjacent industry activity.
  • Worker Demand: First ever defence sector job vacancy index by location and employment type.
  • Predicted hiring activity in the defence sector in the next 18 months.
  • Salaries & Expectations: 2017 salary survey data by skill sets and locations.
  • Factors that will enhance organisation’s ability to attract and retain essential talent.
  • Supply Solutions: How to make the most efficient use of existing workers.
  • How to grow the pool of potential workers, including existing, planned and possible initiatives.
  • Skilled workers are a fundamental input to the capability for industry and government, and now is the time to reduce the risk of mismanagement.