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Program

&

Conference Handbook

 

 

 

Program: Day 1—Tuesday 13 November 2018. 2

Program: Day 2—Wednesday 14 November 2018. 3

Program: Day 3—Thursday 15 November 2018. 4

Session Abstracts: Day 1—13 November 2018. 5

Session Abstracts: Day 2—14 November 2018. 11

Session Abstracts: Day 3—15 November 2018. 18

 


Day 1—Tuesday 13 November 2018

07:30am

Session 1.1 Breakfast Session: Exhibition open and coffee available

9:00am

 

Session 1.2 Expo Session: Opening Session

   Opening: The Right Honorable Christopher Pyne, MP, Minister of Defence

   Welcome: Prof Michael Frater, Rector UNSW Canberra and Mr Stephen Pearson, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

   Keynote Address: Mr Stephen Pearson, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

   Keynote Address: RADM Michael Rothwell, Head ICT Operations Division, CIOG

10.15am

Morning Tea

10.45am

Session 1.3 Expo Session: Industry Engagement and CIS Research Opportunities

   Keynote Address: Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Chief Technology Officer, CIOG

   Keynote Address: Dr Andrew Dowse, Edith Cowan University

   Keynote Address: Ms Kishwar Rahman, GM Policy and Advocacy, Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA)

12.30pm

Lunch

Session 1.4 Product Brief: Augmented Analytics for Enhanced Battlespace Effects, Mr Guy Reeve, MarkLogic and Mr Sibi Ravindran, LNIC

1.30pm

Session 1.5a Expo Session

Product Brief:  How Communications Networks are Evolving to Meet Future Business Demands

(Mr Ashley Hunter, Telstra)

Session 1.6a

Update:  Future ADF Satellite Communications

(LTCOL Mick Hose, JP9102)

Session 1.7a

Product Brief:  Pushing the Envelope- Prototyping an AI Approach to Army Datasets

(Mr Ben Davis, Teradata)

Session 1.8a   Refereed Papers

IEEE Paper: Anomaly Detection in Satellite Communications Systems using LSTM Networks

IEEE Paper: A Passive Tracking System with Decimeter-Level Accuracy Using IEEE 802.11 Signals

Session 1.9a   Refereed Papers

IEEE Paper: Minimising RF Detectability for Low Probability of Detection Communication

IEEE Paper: Autonomous Range Extension using Opal in Obstructed Terrains

Session 1.10a

 

 

 

 

Tutorial:  Military Antenna Fundamentals Focusing on Modern Multiband and HF Antennas

(Mr Jo Eide, Comrod Communication)

2.30pm

Session 1.5b  Expo Session

Product Brief: Leidos’s Defence Health IT Program

(Mr Doug Barton, Leidos)

Session 1.6b

Panel Session:  Future ADF Satellite Communications: Challenges and Opportunities

(LTCOL Mick Hose and Invited Panel)

Session 1.7b

Product Brief:  Classified Cloud Collaboration Within and Between Defence and its Industries

(Ms Deborah Tucek, archTIS)

Session 1.8b   Refereed Papers

IEEE Paper: Combat Analysis of Joint Force Options using Agent-Based Simulation

IEEE Paper: Using Directional Antenna in UAVs to Enhance Tactical Communications

Session 1.9b   Refereed Papers

Industry Paper: Currency and Completeness of Intelligence Mission Data for a Fifth Generation Networked Force

Industry Paper: Towards a Whole-of-Force Data Farming Capability for Force Design

 

3.30pm

Afternoon Tea

4.00pm
to
5:00pm

Session 1.5c  Expo Session

Product Brief: Secure, Resilient and Sovereign Communications

(Mr Simon Barker, Mr Eric Villalonga, & Mr Michael Laske, Airbus)

Session 1.6c

Update: Where to with GPS?  An Update on New Global Navigation Satellite Systems

(Dr Craig Benson, UNSW Canberra)

Session 1.7c

Tutorial: Considerations for the Control Element of Military Communications Systems

(Mr Jeremy Hallett, Clearbox Systems)

Session 1.8c   Refereed Papers

IEEE Paper: Improving the Performance of Land Tactical Digital Networks Using Measures of Network Capacity

IEEE Paper: Distributed Transmit Beamforming: Expanding the Capacity and Range of Tactical Communications

Session 1.9c   Refereed Papers

IEEE Paper: Characterizing TCP/IP for High Frequency Communication Systems

Industry Paper: Digital Multi-Mode, Multi-Mission Satellite Communications Solutions

Session 1.10c

Tutorial:  Adaptive Antennas for Winning over the EW Threat

(Prof Amit Mehta, Swansea University)

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 6:00pm / IEEE Refereed Papers co-sponsored by IEEE

 


Day 2—Wednesday 14 November 2018

07:30am

Session 2.1   Breakfast Session—Exhibition open and coffee available

                       Product Brief: AI as a Force Multiplier for Defence and IntelligenceMr Joseph Cubba, Vice President and Partner, Defense and Intelligence, IBM Services

9.00am

Session 2.2 Expo Session: Innovation, Transforming the Way We Do Things

     Keynote Address: BRIG Murray Thompson, Commander Defence Strategic Communication

     Keynote Address: COL Dan Hartigan, Director Joint Command and Control

10.00am

Morning Tea

10.30am

Session 2.3 Expo Session: Innovation, Transforming the Way We Do Things

     Keynote Address: WGCDR David Clyde, Deputy Director Cyber Warfare and Networks

     Keynote Address: CDRE David Scott, Director General Navy Information Warfare

     Keynote Address: COL Shaun Love, Director Land Network Integration

     Innovation Panel: Ms Sarah Fraser, Director Innovation, CIOG

12.30pm

Lunch

Session 2.4 Product Brief: Breach Detection of Sophisticated, Espionage-focused Cyberattacks using Endpoint Visibility and Large-scale Analytics, Mr Brett Williams, Carbon Black

1.30pm

Session 2.5a Expo Session

Product Brief: SES Networks’ MEO SATCOM Supporting Secure High-Speed Communications for Joint Task Forces

(Mr Glen Tindall, SES Networks)

Session 2.6a

Product Brief:  Can You Imagine—100Mbs Delivered When You Want It, Where You want it? We Did And Now You Can.

(Mr Peter Hadinger, Inmarsat)

Session 2.7a

Tutorial:  Common C2 Interoperability Standards

(Mr Phil Cutforth, Systematic)

Session 2.8a

Update:  Defence Sector CIS Workforce- Supply & Demand

(Mr Robert Kremer, Kinexus)

Session 2.9a

Tutorial: Using SharePoint to Support C2

(Mr Perry Smith, Myriad Technologies)

 

Session 2.10a

Product Brief: Software-defined Cybersecurity Fabric for Dynamic, Scale-out and Cost-optimised Threat Defense

(Mr Prashant Gandhi, Big Switch)

2.30pm

Session 2.5b  Expo Session

Product Brief: Digital Transformation: Change at the Speed of Mission Relevance, Making it Real

(Mr Cameron Chehreh, Dell EMC)

Session 2.6b

Update:  Terminal Transition: Preparing for MILSATCOM beyond WGS and Insertion of Commercial High Capacity

(Mr Andy Lincoln, Viasat)

 

Session 2.7b

Tutorial: Joint C4ISR Interoperability Measurement

(Mr Phil Cutforth, Systematic)

Session 2.8b

Update:  Benefits of Partnering for Managed Cyber Services

(Mr Phil Mar, Viasat)

Session 2.9b

Tutorial: Interagency Collaboration in a Cyber-secure Way

(Mr Perry Smith, Myriad Technologies)

 

Session 2.10b

Update:  No Matter How Big or How Small – Guard Your Data from Exfiltration and Misadventure

(Mr George Kamis, Forcepoint)

3.30pm

Afternoon Tea

4.00pm to 5:00pm

Session 2.5c  Expo Session

Product Brief:  Enabling Instant Situational Awareness: Best Practices for Secure Command and Control Operations

(Mr Richard Cooper, Think Logical)

Session 2.6c

Update:  Hybrid Adaptive Network

(Mr Craig Miller, Viasat)

Session 2.7c

Update:  Employing Wireless to Achieve Manoeuvre and Secure Mobility

(Mr Kristian Howard, Penten)

Session 2.8c

Update:  Crypto-Modernization

(Mr Phil Mar, Viasat)

Session 2.9c

Product Brief: S2IX—Information Appliance

(Mr Perry Smith, Myriad Technologies)

 

Session 2.10c

Update:  "Raising the Bar:" Forcepoint's Experiences in the New Paradigm

(Mr George Kamis, Forcepoint)

7.00-
1100pm

Conference Dinner  (7:00pm for 7:30pm)

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 5:00pm


Day 3—Thursday 15 November 2018

07:30am

Session 3.1 Breakfast Session—Exhibition open and coffee available
                       Product Brief: An Introduction to Comtech’s Assured Communications Satellite Products, Mr Price D'Antonio, Comtech EF Data

9.00am

 

Session 3.2 Expo Session: Industry Engagement, Defence Cyber Security

   Keynote Address: AVM Warren McDonald, Chief of Joint Capabilities

   Keynote Address: MAJGEN Marcus Thompson, Head Information Warfare

10.30am

Morning Tea

11.00am

Session 3.3a Expo Session

Product Brief:  Modernising Mission-critical Applications in the Australian Microsoft Azure Government Cloud

(Mr James Kavanagh, Microsoft)

Session 3.4a Expo Session
Secure Summit Canberra 2018

Today’s Attitudes, Tomorrow’s Opportunities MrTony Vizza, (ISC)2

Cyber-Enabled Information and Influence Warfare and Manipulation (Professor Jill Slay, Latrobe University)

Session 3.5a

Update:  Miniaturization of Link 16 Radios and Impacts to Operational Networks

(Mr Mike Kocin, Viasat)

Session 3.6a

Product Brief: Beyond Classified Platforms - Enabling Australia’s “Smart Defence” Future

(Mr Scott Wilkie, AUCloud)

Session 3.7a

Update: Towards Accelerated Warfare: Generating Military Power Through a More Agile and Integrated C4ISR Architecture

(Mr Guy Reeve, MarkLogic & Mr James Gibson, Fujitsu Australia)

Session 3.8a

Update: Network Performance and Security Management in Today’s Defence Environments

(Dr Rajiv Shah, Net Consulting)

12:00pm

Session 3.3b Expo Session

Update:  JP 9111 – Joint Command and Control

(Mr Jody Whymark, CASG & WGCDR Michael Burgess-Orton, JCG)

Session 3.4b Expo Session
Secure Summit Canberra 2018

Security at the Speed of the Network (Mr Ian Farquhary, Gigamon)

Session 3.5b

Tutorial:  What Determines the Data Rate? A Technical Intro to Radio Communications

(Dr Rowan Gilmore, EM Solutions)

Session 3.6b

Product Brief: Joint Force C4ISREW with SitaWare

(Mr Morten Tolbøl, Systematic)

Session 3.7b

Update: Security Implications of Digitally Transforming your Operations

(Mr Mark Palmer, Ocean Software)

Session 3.8b

 

1.00pm

Lunch Session 3.3c Product Brief: Leveraging Cloud-based Technologies to Enhance Mission Critical Capabilities for Defence Forces (Mr James Kavanagh & Mr Andrew-Thomas Ball, Microsoft)

2.00pm

Session 3.3d  Expo Session

Update: JP 9347 – Joint Data Networks

(COL Tony Ross & Mr David Miller, CASG & COL Daniel Hartigan, JCG)

Session 3.4d Expo Session
Secure Summit Canberra 2018

Demystifying Cyber Insurance (Mr Andrew Taylor, Chubb)

Incident Response Communication (Mr Craig Searle, Hivint)

Session 3.5d

Tutorial:  Flexible Modem Interface—Enabling Network Solutions for Multi-Service Provider Roaming across the Wideband SATCOM Enterprise

(Mr Kevin Zhang, Supinf-Technologies)

Session 3.6d

Update: Australian Generic Vehicle Architecture (GVA) Update

(MAJ Michael Dawson, ASGVA Office, AHQ)

Session 3.7d

Update: Employing Cyber Deception to Detect and Track Sophisticated Adversaries

(Mr Ben Whitham, Penten)

Session 3.8d

Update: Towards Automatic Implementation of TDL Systems

(Prof Dr Eggendorfer Tobias, Universität der Bundeswehr München)

3.00pm

Session 3.3e Expo Session

Update: JP 2221 – Multinational Information Sharing and JP2060 – Deployable Medical Capability

(Mr Basil Dewhurst, CASG & WGCDR Michael Burgess-Orton & Mr Jim Walker, JCG)

Session 3.4e Expo Session
Secure Summit Canberra 2018

The Critical Factors For Deploying Your Secure SD-WAN (Mr Jack Chan, Fortinet)

Supply Chain Insecurity (Mr Nick Savvides, Symantec)

Session 3.5e

Update: One Loose Cable: Why the 5th Generation Army Needs a Corps of Combat Communicators

(SGT Richard Morgan, 31/42 RQR)

Session 3.6e

Update: System-to-system Formatted Communication

(Mr Kristoffer Davis Foldbjerg, Systematic)

Session 3.7e

Update: Defence Spectrum Update

(Mr David Murray, Department of Defence)

Session 3.8e

 

4.00pm

Afternoon Tea

4.30pm to 5:30pm

Session 3.3f  Expo Session

Update: LAND 200: Digital Evolution of Land Forces Command and Control

(COL Mick Toohey, CASG & COL Joanne Whitaker, AHQ)

Session 3.4f Expo Session
Secure Summit Canberra 2018

Australia’s Cyber Workforce

(Mr Byron Nagy, AustCyber)

Incident Response Communication (Mr Craig Searle, Hivint)

 

Session 3.6f

Update: Smart Integration – Simple on the Other side of Complex

(Mr David Abel, LUMINACT)

Session 3.7f

Update: JNT9101-1 Project PHOENIX—The Enhanced Defence HF Communications System

(Mr Steve Wright, Department of Defence)

Session 3.8f

 

Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 4:30pm



MILCIS 2018
Session Abstracts

Session Abstracts: Day 1 - 13 November 2018

1.1 Breakfast Session

 

The Exhibition is open and coffee is available in the Exhibition Hall.

 

1.2 Plenary Session—Opening Session

 

Opening: The Right Honorable Christopher Pyne, MP, Minister of Defence

Welcome: Professor Michael Frater, Rector UNSW Canberra and Mr Stephen Pearson, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

Keynote Address: Mr Stephen Pearson, Chief Information Officer, CIOG

Keynote Address: RADM Michael Rothwell, Head ICT Operations Division, CIOG

 

1.3  Plenary Session: CIO Session

 

Keynote Address: Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Chief Technology Officer, CIOG

Keynote Address: Enhancing Defence CIS through Research and Education Dr Andrew Dowse, Edith Cowan University

Keynote Address: Re-imagining Industry Engagement Ms Kishwar Rahman, GM Policy and Advocacy, Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA)

 

1.4  Lunch Session Product Brief: Augmented Analytics for Enhanced Battlespace Effects

 

Presented by: Mr Guy Reeve; Manager, Defence, MarkLogic and Mr Sibi Ravindran; Technical Design Architect, Generic Vehicle Architecture Project, Australian Army Land Network Integration Centre

 

Army’s Land Network Integration Centre (LNIC) continues to develop new approaches and technology solutions to improving interoperability and decision support for the warfighter. This presentation will examine how LNIC has adapted a domain-agnostic data ingestion and integration engine for a range of purposes, with examples of improvements in three different domains aimed at enhancing effects in the battlespace. Case study examples range from a post-exercise data integration and analytics solution for improving network performance management and optimisation, through real time data integration as a core component of the Army’s Generic Vehicle Architecture project, to an emerging solution for machine-augmented decision support providing automated insights as a result of real-time interrogation, integration and enrichment of data from a range of disparate, unstructured sources to deliver better informed decisions in the battlespace.

 

1.5a Product Brief: How Communications Networks are Evolving to Meet Future Business Demands

 

Presenter:  Mr Ashley Hunter; Executive, Telstra

 

Defence’s organisations demands are changing and networks need to evolve to support the need for fluid, highly secure and responsive IT services.  These demands include high bandwidth traffic, meshed networks involving capturing and disseminating sensor and war fighter information, IOT sensors and high-resolution video for situational awareness.  This session will focus on how changes in technology are happening at a rapid rate and how the deployment of new technologies such as 5G, IoT and the use of Software Defined Networking (SDN), can give you greater control of your communications, provide you with enhanced tools and operating systems and get information to where it is needed faster.

 

1.5b Update: Leidos’s Defence Health IT Program

 

Presenter:  Mr Doug Barton; CTO & Chief Engineer for Leidos Health, Leidos

 

Doug Barton is the Chief Technical Officer and Chief Engineer with Leidos Health, based in Reston, Virginia.  He has an extensive background working in complex programs including ISR and most recently Health IT.  Leidos Health offers services and solutions to federal and commercial clients, including IT services, population health risk management, case management, health analytics, life sciences, and public health.  Of particular note, Leidos is the Prime Systems Integrator for the US Department of Defense (DOD) Healthcare Management System Modernization (DHMSM) Military Health System (MHS) GENESIS program.  DHMSM’s mission is to fundamentally and positively impact the health outcomes of active duty military, veterans and beneficiaries; in the most efficient and effective way possible through two distinct goals:

•              Create a seamless electronic health record integrating VA and DoD data

•              Modernize the software supporting DoD and VA clinicians

Doug was in the inaugural CTO for MHS GENESIS and will provide insights into the program, its current status and some of the particular challenges inherent in a Defence health IT program.

 

1.5c Update: Secure, Resilient and Sovereign Communications

 

Presenter: Mr Simon Barker, Airbus Defence and Space; Mr Eric Villalonga, Airbus; and Mr Michael Laske, Airbus Defence and Space

 

This presentation will look at three key elements delivered as part of a Secure Resilient and Sovereign communications strategy, namely:

          Secure resilient space asset(s). Space is definitively a field of confrontation and requires secure resilient assets, vital for complex air, ground and naval operations including positioning, communications, reconnaissance and interception missions. Electronic, cyber-and physical attacks against satellites could cause major disruption. A system wide approach needs to be followed to guarantee resilience and a combination of hardening, new architectures, disaggregation, dispersion and proliferation of space components can provide this. The new LEO and MEO satellite constellations offer means of disaggregation combined with low latency and global coverage and GEO satellites are evolving to offer the high throughputs needed for modern military operations as well as being able to be reconfigurable. Confidentiality, integrity and guarantee of capacity access are key drivers for countries developing their own sovereign space capabilities, such as Australia.

          Collect, Share & Access. The ability to collect, share and access information securely, reliably and in a trusted manner is becoming increasingly important as we move from the traditional “stove-piped”, platform-centric systems to network-centric capabilities.  The information being shared by the communicating systems has value – the process of sharing and disseminating this increases that value, which in turn raises the profile of the network to potential disruptors.

          From data to intelligence, the missing link in ISR supply chains. Sensor Data Collection and Intelligence, these are the starting and the end point of the chain to obtain/ create executable information and information superiority. The Airbus Intelligence Exploitation Surveillance Suite (InESS) will link the two points of the chain together, by fusion of all kinds of Sensor data into one system.

 

1.6a Update: Future ADF Satellite Communications

 

Presenter:  LTCOL Mick Hose, Deputy Director Future ADF Satellite Communications, JP9102

 

The future ADF Satellite Communications project, JP 9102, will deliver the space, ground and control segments of the Australian Defence SATCOM System (ASDSS) from the mid 2020s.  In order for the ASDSS to provide resilient and responsive communications beyond the range and capacity of other communication mediums, a range of capability options spanning different bands, orbits and partnering arrangements are being considered by JP 9102 while it is in Risk Mitigation and Requirement Setting Phase.  The capability opportunities and costings of various options will be informed by an industry RFI to be released in early 2019 with an industry information day scheduled for Jan/Feb 19.  This session will update attendees on the capability option scope, costing, schedule and challenges of JP 9102 ASDSS.

 

1.6b Panel Session: Future ADF Satellite Communications: Challenges and Opportunities

 

Moderator:  LTCOL Mick Hose, Deputy Director Future ADF Satellite Communications, JP9102

 

Panel Members: Mr Colin Cooper, ViaSat; Mr Iwan Morris, Airbus; Mr Ian Turner, Boeing Defence Australia; Mr Glenn Tindall, SES/O3b; Mr Stephen Jewell, Optus; Mr Jeremy Hallett, Clearbox Systems; Mr Todd McDonnell, Inmarsat.

 

Capability options that could satisfy the requirements of the future ADF Satellite Communications project (JP 9102) span a range of band, orbit and partnering arrangements.  In order to inform the capability opportunities and costings, JP 9102 ASDSS is releasing an industry RFI in early 2019 preceded by an industry information day on Jan/Feb 19.  Prior to this RFI, JP 9102 ASDSS is seeking feedback from industry on how to shape the RFI in order to achieve a balance of the project obtaining opportunity and costing information while industry does not spend a disproportionate amount of time responding.  The panel will discuss a range of considerations, such as the Australian Space Agency, Australian Space industry, significant investments to date in current ADF SATCOM, partnering pros and cons, key technology opportunities and the competitiveness of the international Space industry.

 

1.6c Update: Where to with GPS? An Update on New Global Navigation Satellite Systems

 

Presenter:  Dr Craig Benson, UNSW Canberra

 

GPS has revolutionised the accessibility of precision position and time.  Small, light, cheap, low-power, non-radiating receivers now provide position accurate to a few meters, and time accurate to a ten millionth of a second anywhere on the Earth.  This underpins capabilities ranging from near-precision guided weapons to easy-to-use secure radios, individual tracking of mobile assets and so on.  

 

GPS is however just a single example of the class of systems known as Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs).  Glonass was a Soviet peer of GPS from early on, and is maintained by Russia to this day, however several other GNSSs, or regional variants thereof now exist, such as Beidou, Galileo and IRNSS.

 

In this presentation we provide an introduction to how GNSSs work, and the user features that result.  We then provide an update on the various constellations, including new signals and near-term plans of the system operators.  This is followed by a brief discussion of the GNSS augmentation system recently funded by the federal government.  We then describe risks to the capabilities enables by GNSS, including the threat of jamming.  Finally we close with an exploration of how the availability of multiple GNSSs, and many new signals might change the way we use GNSSs.???

 

1.7a Update: Pushing the Envelope—Prototyping an AI Approach to Army Datasets

 

Presenter:  Mr Ben Davis; Senior Architect, Teradata

 

The Australian Army operates a data analytics lab environment that provides an exploratory data analysis capability across a wide range of multivariant data types.

 

Within this environment we have been leveraging advanced analytic techniques to analyse communication system logs to determine the root cause of anomalous messages. Whilst the logs were intended for software engineers to debug their system, the use of AI and other methods to find new insights within the data has shown considerable benefits to the Army. The view now is that any data regardless of its origin can be mined for new insights. From comms logs, IOT devices through to battlefield platforms and everything in between, the Army can use the environment to develop ground breaking insights in rapid time. In our presentation we will demonstrate some of the insights from our work and also the challenges in mining logs that were never intended to be mined.

 

1.7b Update: Classified Cloud Collaboration Within and Between Defence and its Industries

 

Presenter: Ms Deborah Tucek; Marketing & Product Design Executive, archTIS

 

Need to collaborate with government agencies, services, units or industry partners? Collaboration is critical for increasing productivity and speeding decision-making processes. For Defence, however, collaborating on classified content has proven challenging – not only within and between services, but also with members outside their agencies, be they remote workers, contractors, consultants or personnel from collaborating agencies. Defence needs to provide differentiated access to information in order to ‘get the job done’, but at the same time ensure that sensitive or classified content is not exposed to unauthorised personnel.

 

KOJENSI GOV is a secure content and collaboration cloud service that has been designed specifically to resolve these challenges. Hosted within an accredited PROTECTED cloud environment, Kojensi Gov enables agencies to rapidly set up shared workspaces where each user receives a personalised view of the content based on their security clearance, nationality, organisation and other security and sharing settings. Authorised industry personnel and consulting staff can gain secure differentiated access to the shared workspace and commence work straight away on unclassified content provided by Defence. Higher security clearances can be applied dynamically at a later date to give contractors access to relevant classified content upon their next login to the same shared workspace.

 

This demonstration will show how Kojensi Gov can enable multiple organisations to rapidly stand up a shared digital workspace that enables users from diverse security classifications, nationalities and organisations, to share and collaborate on those information assets that are needed and authorised for their use.

 

1.7c Tutorial: Considerations for the Control Element of Military Communications Systems

 

Presenter:  Mr Jeremy Hallett; Executive Director; Clearbox Systems

 

Military Communications Systems are the glue that hold the joint force together. They continue to increase in capability allowing for greater military effect. However, this capability has been accompanied by growing complexity increasing the demands on the modern warfighter to control these systems and making a robust Control element a necessity.

 

This tutorial presents some considerations for the Control element of Military Communications Systems covering both technical and support topics and touching on some thoughts for how best to engage for a procurement and total cost of ownership.

 

Technical topics include: Equipment and Sensor Monitoring and Control, Spectrum Monitoring, Network Management, Automation (including AI and Machine Learning) and Security.

 

Support System topics include: Personnel requirements, Training, Software Updates and Technical Refresh.

 

1.8a Refereed Papers—IEEE and Industry Streams

 

IEEE Paper: Anomaly Detection in Satellite Communications Systems using LSTM Networks

Authors: Edward Arbon and Peter Smet (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia); Lachlan Gunn (Aalto University, Finland); Mark D McDonnell (University of South Australia, Australia)

Abstract. Most satellite communications monitoring tools use simple thresholding of univariate measurements to alert the operator to unusual events [1] [2]. This approach suffers from frequent false alarms, and is moreover unable to detect sequence or multivariate anomalies [3]. Here we consider the problem of detecting outliers in high-dimensional time-series data, such as transponder frequency spectra. Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) networks are able to form sophisticated representations of such multivariate temporal data, and can be used to predict future sequences when presented with sufficient context. We report here on the utility of LSTM prediction error as a defacto measure for detecting outliers. We show that this approach significantly improves on simple threshold models, as well as on moving average and static predictors. The latter simply assume the next trace will be equal to the previous trace. The advantages of using an LSTM network for anomaly detection are twofold. Firstly, the training data do not need to be labelled. This alleviates the need to provide the model with specific examples of anomalies. Secondly, the trained model is able to detect previously unseen anomalies. Such anomalies have a degree of unpredictability that makes them stand out. LSTM networks are further able to potentially detect more nuanced sequence and multivariate anomalies. These occur when all values are within normal tolerances, but the sequence or combinations of values are themselves unusual. The technique we describe could be used in practice for alerting satellite network operators to unusual conditions requiring their attention.

 

IEEE Paper: A Passive Tracking System with Decimeter-Level Accuracy Using IEEE 802.11 Signals

Authors: Navod Suraweera (Macquarie University, Australia); Shenghong Li and Mark Johnson (CSIRO, Australia); Iain B. Collings and Stephen Hanly (Macquarie University, Australia); Wei Ni and Mark Hedley (CSIRO, Australia)

Abstract. This paper presents a novel passive tracking system to localize a moving target using asynchronous self-locating receivers, which passively listen to the IEEE 802.11 signals transmitted by the target. We have developed passive single-antenna IEEE 802.11ac receivers that estimate time-difference-of-arrival (TDoA) between multipath components at each receiver, and as such, they do not depend on synchronization between the target and the receivers. We have developed a new localization algorithm based on particle filtering (PF), which completes its execution in real-time, and is robust to sharp turns made by the target without following the motion model. The performance is demonstrated experimentally and shown to have a target localization error below 30 cm for all the target locations.

 

1.8b Refereed Papers—IEEE and Industry Streams

 

IEEE Paper: Combat Analysis of Joint Force Options using Agent-Based Simulation

Authors: Andrew Au (Defence Science and Technology Group, Department of Defence, Australia); Peter Hoek (Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia); Edward H. S. Lo (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia)

Abstract. The Australian Defence Force (ADF) will continue to evolve its capabilities to facilitate more effective integration of the joint force in an extended battlespace. The availability of key capabilities can have the potential to contribute to greater operational effectiveness. However designing a force is not simply adding new platforms to the inventory, but shaping a system of coordinated capabilities. A key part of this evolution is about utilising weapon systems throughout the battlespace that are networked to enable coordinated employment. As an example of evaluating a joint force along these lines, an exploratory analysis using an abstracted combat model was performed to gain quantitative insight on the value of information or force advantage in a fictitious conflict. This agent-based simulation can be used in designing a force to compare the relative worth of combat units in terms of offensive and defensive power.

 

IEEE Paper: Using Directional Antenna in UAVs to Enhance Tactical Communications

Author: Andrew Coyle (University of Adelaide, Australia)

Abstract. Military tactical networks exist in a changing and noisy environment. Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks (MANETs) are often used in this environment as they provide the flexibility to accommodate this dynamic behaviour. However, by having the military units define the topology of the network, there may be a lack of connectivity or available capacity in the network. Smart positioning of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can ensure that disconnected parts of a network are connected. There are a number of ways that the efficacy of UAVs can be enhanced. Smarter positioning, adaptive modulation, and directional antenna can all be used to create a more robust network. This paper looks at how UAVs interact with a tactical radio network and how directional antenna can be used to get an even greater benefit from the UAVs. Results showing how the UAVs can increase the connectivity and capacity of the network are presented.

 

1.8c Refereed Papers—IEEE and Industry Streams

 

IEEE Paper: Improving the Performance of Land Tactical Digital Networks Using Measures of Network Capacity

Authors: Andrew Coyle and Hung Xuan Nguyen (University of Adelaide, Australia); Peter Boyd (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia); Gregory Judd (Science Team Leader, Australia)

Abstract. Land tactical radio networks are used in military operations to create communication channels for tactical units at the force's edge. These radios must work in a dynamic, contested environment where bandwidth is usually at a premium due to the limited radio capabilities and the many demands placed on the system. It is important therefore to manage the networks as efficiently as possible. Measuring the state and performance of the network is required to achieve this, which is a non-trivial exercise due to the complexity and variability of network designs. Any measurement schema must take into consideration the implementation, state and use of the radio network. Previous work in this area has concentrated on commercially available networks rather than the bespoke networks that are often employed in the military. As part of the SMARTNet research programme, this paper looks at techniques that are currently available for measuring a tactical network's performance, investigates what other work needs to be done, and suggests a way forward. A simple network has been analysed mathematically and then emulated using the Enhanced Mobile Ad-hoc Network Emulator (EMANE) to highlight the issues discussed in this paper.

 

IEEE Paper: Distributed Transmit Beamforming: Expanding the Capacity and Range of Tactical Communications

Authors: Ian Grivell and Stephen Leak (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia); Hajime Suzuki, Chang Kyung Sung and Mark Hedley (CSIRO, Australia); Gottfried Lechner, Marc Lavenant, Hidayat Soetiyono and Dmitry Kramarev (University of South Australia, Australia)

Abstract. Phased array antenna technologies have been used for communications and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) for many decades to create steerable beams that more efficiently focus energy in desired directions. Generally they have been based on the classical approach of fixed antenna elements evenly spaced at some fraction of a wavelength, all connected to a single transceiver. Distributed transmit beamforming is a more recent approach that does not conform to these design constraints. Individual radios are array elements that are dispersed far beyond a single wavelength from each other and which are allowed to move around the battlespace, with the distributed transmit beamforming protocol maintaining the necessary synchronisation between array nodes to ensure energy is concentrated on a distant receiver. In this paper we report on progress to develop an implementation of distributed transmit beamforming that is based on the receiver providing explicit feedback of channel information to the array nodes using a separate backchannel, allowing for high speed, accurate frequency and phase synchronisation of nodes to build an array as required.

 

1.9a Refereed Papers—IEEE and Industry Streams

 

IEEE Paper: Minimising RF Detectability for Low Probability of Detection Communication

Authors: Benjamin Campbell, Anthony Perry and Robert Hunjet (Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia); Guangsong Wang and Bruce Northcote (University of Adelaide, Australia)

Abstract. This paper describes the need for management of transmission powers in mobile land networks in order to achieve low probability of detection. It explores applicable work in topology control and presents sub-graph search, a localized search method for finding the topology with the lowest detectability footprint. It presents algorithms which can be applied to existing topology control techniques in order to minimise the probability of detection and evaluates them using demonstration and comparison to the sub-graph search method.

 

IEEE Paper: Autonomous Range Extension using Opal in Obstructed Terrains

Authors: Asanka Kekirigoda (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia); Kin-Ping Hui (Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia); Damien J Phillips (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia); Alan Allwright (DSTO, Australia)

Abstract. The range extension of tactical mobile wireless communications networks is of paramount importance to military forces, especially to improve the survivability of mobile networks. Often these networks must operate in situations where nodes are constrained by command and control and the operating environment. In order to satisfy such complex requirements Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group has developed Opal, an autonomous agent based system designed to control mobile network nodes including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In this paper we extend Opal to operate in scenarios where an autonomous UAV is not allowed to operate in certain regions due to various constraints. We show through simulation that Opal is effective in minimising network disconnection time is such scenarios.

 

1.9b Refereed Papers—IEEE and Industry Streams

 

Industry Paper: Currency and Completeness of Intelligence Mission Data for a Fifth Generation Networked Force

Author: John O'Neill (Envista, Australia)

Abstract. Data and information exchange is underpinned by Intelligence Mission Data (IMD) that enables sensor input to be characterised and reported. The completeness and currency of IMD are important considerations for enabling manoeuvre in the Electro-Magnetic Spectrum (EMS) domain. This paper examines the IMD requirements in a future complex urban environment context; examines the risks to the ADF for operating with incomplete IMD; proposes a method for analyzing the IMD kill chain; and proposes the need for a discovery activity for actionable intelligence to update IMD in timeframes suitable for a Fifth Generation Networked Force.

 

Industry Paper: Towards a Whole-of-Force Data Farming Capability for Force Design

Authors: Edward H. S. Lo (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia); Peter Hoek (Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia); Andrew Au (Defence Science and Technology Group, Department of Defence, Australia); Michael Slade and Phuong La (Defence Science and Technology Group, Australia)

Abstract. Increasing complexity of modern operations makes relying solely on intuition for force design decisions, difficult. Joint Future OpeRating Concept Explorer (JFOrCE) is an agent-based simulation capability being developed in NetLogo to support options analysis for the Australian Defence Force force structure review process. This paper describes the design concept using a top-down approach of realising future operating concepts in simulation to support force design analysis. The implementation of (1) JFOrCE and (2) a concept demonstrator for enabling NetLogo simulation experiments on an aspirational High Performance Computing (HPC) platform is presented. Data farming to support analysis and optimisation of force structures against modelled threats, enables JFOrCE to become a valuable decision-support tool in force structure review.

 

1.9c Refereed Papers—IEEE and Industry Streams

 

IEEE Paper: Characterizing TCP/IP for High Frequency Communication Systems

Authors: Alvin DMello (Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia); Ernest Foo (Queensland University of Technology, Australia); Jason Reid (Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia)

Abstract. TCP/IP over HF has for long been challenging and avoided due to the erroneous HF channel and the low bandwidth available. With Wideband HF (WBHF) set to being adopted around the world, TCP/IP over HF is being revisited and options are starting to be explored. Although WBHF provides more bandwidth over what was previously available, it does not overcome the erroneous behaviour of the HF channel which is governed by physics and environmental conditions. In this paper we examine the characteristics of TCP/IP when it operates in a HF environment. We derive the thresholds of variables like MSS, RTOs and latency that impact TCP/IP communications and analyze it with respect to other communication parameters. We then discuss the interdependencies of TCP parameters when applied to an HF environment. Based on these finding, we recommend a set of design principles for HF-TCP, a TCP stack for TCP over HF communications. Experimentation is conducted on a model built in OMNet++ with its individual modules fine-tuned to provide the capability to implement HF environmental factors.

 

Industry Paper: Digital Multi-Mode, Multi-Mission Satellite Communications Solutions

Author: Tony F Sewell (DataPath, Inc., USA)

Abstract. The threat environment for military communications is evolving quickly, demanding greater resilience, adaptability and flexibility for communication planners. The variety of mobility platforms to communicate with is expanding, and so too the diversity of communications (particularly space-based) mediums. In parallel, government procurement agencies are seeking more 'bang for the buck', and standards-based approaches to ensure future-proofed investment. This paper analyzes this new strategic context based on public defence communications policy statements, and proposes technology and implementation solutions to address these challenges. As communications technologies converge, we find that a systems-based approach can potentially achieve significantly greater flexibility for mission planners, while maximizing economies over the life of the systems.

 

1.10a/b Tutorial: Military Antenna fundamentals Focusing on Modern Multiband and HF Antennas

 

Presenter:  Mr Jo Eide, CTO, Comrod Communication

 

Comrod will present an antenna tutorial with some general/fundamental antenna topics, and also a focus on antennas and propagation in military use. The audience is intended to be (mainly) engineers within electronics and communication. Attendants with substantial antenna experience may get some useful info.

 

Topics are:

        Main antenna characteristics

        Basic antenna types

        Radio waves & propagation, including some extra info on HF NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence)

        Radio range and system calculations

        Cable & Connectors

        Filters and combiners

        Reducing the number of antennas on a platform with the use of multiband antennas, combiners and diplexers

        Collocation / EMC / EMI and RADHAZ

        Antenna measurements

 

1.10c Tutorial: Adaptive Antennas for Winning over EW Threat

 

Presenter:  Professor Amit Mehta; Swansea University

 

With new emerging EW process such as ‘Internet of Military Things’ it is increasing becoming a necessity to manage, control and protect forces EM signature and platforms. This tutorial will provide insights into new form of Adaptive RF antenna systems which could enable this. The tutorial will also provide direct applications which could benefit from deployment of such adaptive antennas. These includes combat scenarios, high speed moving space platforms (e.g. swarms of UAVs), command centres and patrol mobile units. The tutorial with conclude with results from some European funded defence work showcasing the cost and mission critical advantages from miniaturised adaptive antennas.

 


Session Abstracts: Day 2 - 14 November 2018

2.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: AI as a Force Multiplier for Defence and Intelligence

 

Presenter: Mr Joseph Cubba; Vice President and Partner, Defense and Intelligence, IBM Services

 

With shifting global challenges and trends, AI has now become a critical National Security capability. The race is on to use AI-human partnerships as a Force Multiplier for strategic, tactical and enterprise operations, with defence agencies looking at AI to be the power source to bring Defence missions to another level.

 

AI security, reliably curated training data, and transparent and trusted machine learning are essential to developing, fielding and operating AI-human systems. Attend this session to gain insights into how AI is being effectively integrated across agency operations to anticipate and pre-empt risk and threats.

 

2.2 Plenary Session:

 

The Defence Global Communications Network; Lessons, Innovation and Opportunities: BRIG Murray Thompson, CDSC

Innovation and Joint C2: COL Dan Hartigan, Director Joint Command and Control

 

2.3 Plenary Session:

 

Cyber Space Domain-transformation, the Art of War: WGCDR David Clyde, Deputy Director Cyber Warfare and Networks

Delivering ICT Networks to Navy Platforms: CDRE David Scott, Director General Navy Information Warfare

How to Build a Babel Fish – Integration challenges in the Information Age: COL Shaun Love, Director Land Network Integration

Innovation Panel: Ms Sarah Fraser, Director Innovation, CIOG

 

2.4 Lunch Session Product Brief: Breach Detection of Sophisticated, Espionage-focused Cyberattacks using Endpoint Visibility and Large-scale Analytics

 

Presenter: Mr Brett Williams, SE Director, APJ, Carbon Black

 

This session will provide a powerful analysis of the latest attack trends seen by the world’s top incident response (IR) firms. Even as a steady drumbeat of headlines keeps the world’s attention focused on cybercrimes, such as ransomware and cryptojacking, in the dark corners of the internet, attackers are busy refining their craft. According to the world’s top incident response (IR) professionals, cyberattackers are honing their ability to remain undetected inside the enterprises they’ve breached, and evolving their attacks to counter defenders’ response efforts.   Using the scale of the cloud and large data sets for analytics, it’s possible to get ahead of these attacks.   As part of this session, Carbon Black will provide an overview of how endpoint visibility and data analytics, can be used to detect and stop the dynamic behaviour of sophisticated attackers.

 

2.5a Product Brief: SES Networks’ MEO SATCOM Supporting Secure High-Speed Communications for Joint Task Forces

 

Presenter:  Mr Glen Tindall; Sales Director, Government APAC, SES Network

 

Globally, there is a number of key trends impacting military SATCOM users, with particular relevance for forces deployed overseas:

(a)        An increase in the number and diversity of networked warfighting platforms;

(b)        Widespread use of higher bandwidth C4 applications, driven by the superior security, manageability and supportability of cloud based architectures over deployed server architectures;

(c)        An increased demand for full motion video carriage, providing increased situational awareness both at headquarters and at forward deployed locations;

(d)        A highly contested RF and Cyber environment;

(e)        Challenges in sustainment of complex ICT and SATCOM solutions in theatre.

 

This session addresses how SES Networks’ MEO SATCOM can provide support to the communication line of the Joint Task Forces, in a secure and efficient manner.

 


2.5b Product Brief: Digital Transformation: Change at the Speed of Mission Relevance, Making it Real

 

Presenter:  Mr Cameron Chehreh, Dell EMC

 

Dell EMC are pleased to present our global vision to implement Digital Transformation amongst military and government organisations. Join Cameron Chehreh, Federal Chief Technology Officer and Vice President of Pre-Sales Engineering Dell EMC, for his presentation on Dell EMC’s global initiatives for Digital Transformation and how it underpins our “Moving at the speed of Mission relevance” strategy for our Department of Defence and National Security Community customers. This presentation will cover:

 

       Why is Digital Transformation relevant to Military and Govt organisations and the core tenets of how this strategy is applied in a kinetic platform

       The shift between traditional and new Information Technology and the forces driving this transformation

       Utilising a cloud-based business model to support unique mission requirements

       Understanding operational environments and challenges to create situational awareness

 

Dell EMC are proud to support our Global Defence customers and the vital importance of mission outcomes. Our vision is to empower our customers and teams to achieve their missions in an agile and flexible manner while reducing the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) for our customers. We look forward to our opportunity to present this vision.

 

2.5c Product Brief: Enabling Instant Situational Awareness: Best Practices for Secure Command and Control Operations

 

Presenter:  Mr Richard Cooper; President; Thinklogical, A Belden Brand

 

The proliferation of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) information is radically changing the landscape of defence and intelligence operations. The goal of “Information Superiority” is required to understand and defend against a broad range of threats, both internal and external. A massive effort has been directed at collecting data through sensors including satellites, unmanned vehicles, human intelligence, and the monitoring of social media and traditional media sources.

 

The analysis of this information happens in a secure command and control centres, often in collaboration with joint and coalition forces. The operational focus in these centres is “Instant Situational Awareness;” that is, “How can I use the ISR information available to me to provide a full and immediate picture of the situation to help make faster and better-informed decisions?”

 

In this session, attendees will learn how to:

        Achieve information superiority and instant situational awareness through immediate access to critical video and data resources via “any-to-any” switching.

        Simplify management of multiple classifications of information through a single IA (information assurance) approved distribution infrastructure.

        Reduce attack surface and increase cyber security by mitigating the threat of intentional or accidental breach, hack or data loss by insiders.

        Seamlessly integrate diverse legacy, cloud and VDI infrastructures while reducing IT resource requirements.

        Future-proof video, audio, and signal management systems to support advances in technology, including 4K, VR and HDR.

        Enable flexible and rapid reconfiguration of C2 facilities to quickly adapt to changing mission requirements

        Reduce up-front IT and AV infrastructure expense while lowering long-term total cost of ownership.

 

2.6a  Product Brief: Can You Imagine—100Mbs Delivered When You Want It, Where You want it? We Did And Now You Can

 

Presenter:  Mr Peter Hadinger; CTO, Inmarsat

 

Military communication challenges often stem from budget, acquisition and cultural issues rather than technological capabilities. Inmarsat has a long history in working with the ADF to develop functionality beyond that which was considered possible within the confines of these challenges by integrating commercial architecture and strategy to provide satcom systems that are interoperable with government-owned and operated platforms. In recent times, this has included trials for high capacity military grade beams which will exponentially augment WGS capacity and operational capability, giving military customers access to fully integrated commercial platforms within an end-to-end managed service architecture.

 

Peter Hadinger, Inmarsat CTO and former President of the US Government Business Unit, will provide a road map of the latest developments which have cemented Inmarsat’s place as the standard setter in mobile satellite communications. He will also address the technical reasons why commercial should stop thinking in terms of behemoth 'all things to all people' satellite assets, and rather, focus on fulfilling specific user needs in specific geographies and sectors.

 

2.6b  Update: Terminal Transition: Preparing for MILSATCOM beyond WGS and Insertion of Commercial High Capacity

 

Presenter:  Mr Andy Lincoln; CTO, Government Systems; Viasat

 

This update describes the trends and challenges faced by MILSATCOM terminals in the 2020’s and 2030’s. While today’s MILSATCOM terminals are dominated by Geosynchronous WGS compatibility (X- and “mil” Ka-band), Commercial capabilities have outstripped MILSATCOM and this trend will accelerate. Commercial systems offer resilience, security, coverage, capacity, and speeds that are essential components in future military operations which rely on information dominance and strong cyber defense. It’s no longer a question of ‘if’ we should adopt Commercial technology, it is really a question of ‘how’ to adopt Commercial technology, which is inextricably tied into ‘when’ we can upgrade terminals. Taking the fastest affordable path to include Commercial capability will benefit our warfighters while forcing adversaries to recapitalize.

 

Effective, affordable terminal transition requires consideration of trends in frequency bands, orbits, vertical integration, miniaturization, interoperability, technology refresh cycles, terminal lifecycles, and response to jamming or other localized threats. Terminal transition is challenging in general, but there are specific courses of action we can take to update existing terminals, and other courses of action we would recommend for terminal technology refresh and replacement. For example, by upgrading some of the highest quantity terminal types (ground transportable, at the halt), the existing MILSATCOM network is better able serve users who can’t transition easily.

 

Viasat will address these topics and explain the work we and our partners are doing to enable terminal transition for Allied militaries.

 

2.6c Update: Hybrid Adaptive Network

 

Presenter:  Mr Craig Miller; VP, CTO, Government Systems; Viasat

 

This update describes the “Hybrid Adaptive Network” (HAN) concept, a flexible service delivery platform that provides a robust, scalable satellite communications network built on open standards. The HAN concept leverages the exponential technology growth of the private sector to close capability gaps, deliver enhanced warfighter connectivity and avoids vendor lock by enabling ongoing, market-based competition for government communication services.

 

Hybrid Adaptive Networks (HANs) are composed of multiple, independent communications networks which the warfighter can seamlessly access in much the same way commercial mobile device users can roam across varied cellular networks. The component transport networks that make up the HAN may be commercial, government purpose-built, or a combination of both.

 

Hybrid Networks may span multiple orbital regimes, operate over multiple frequency bands, provide independent terrestrial infrastructure and feature different network management and cyber defense implementations, providing inherent diversity and removing single points of failure and/or attack. The user population of a Hybrid Adaptive Network will organically be spread across multiple different transport networks, making it very difficult for an adversary to target their communications capability for collection, exploitation or denial.

 

Hybrid Adaptive Networks are enabled by multi-waveform, multi-band terminals and flexible, automated, standards based network management, which are already being developed and deployed in the private sector.

 

The HAN approach is low risk, having been proven in the private sector via hybrid satellite services contracts, including high profile customers such as United States Air Force 1 operating across a constellation of multiple Ku- and Ka-band satellites.

 

2.7a Tutorial: Common C2 Interoperability Standards

 

Presenter: Mr Phil Cutforth; Senior Architect / Systems Design, NZDF NEA Programme, Systematic

 

Military interoperability for Command and Control (C2) systems is supported by a multitude of international standards, of which VMF is just one. This session will explore the many standards and how they may best be applied to exchange C2 information.  It will also examine the challenges in establishing interoperability between C2 systems and how these may be addressed, exploring the NZDF Network Enabled Army Programme as a case study with application in Australia.


2.7b Tutorial: Joint C4ISR Interoperability Measurement

 

Presenter: Mr Phil Cutforth; Senior Architect, Systematic

 

Interoperability is often cited as one of the principal Benefits or Investment Objectives of C2 system acquisition. However, acquisition programmes often fall short when it comes to measuring Interoperability benefits or identifying appropriate KPIs against which to measure Interoperability achievements.  There have been many academic papers produced that attempt to establish frameworks or models to measure interoperability but surprisingly, none have gained any real traction with global Defence organisations.  In the 1990’s, NATO attempted to address this conundrum and developed the widely adopted LISI standard, though it is rarely seen in use any longer.

The NZDF Network Enabled Army (NEA) Programme highlighted ‘Interoperability’ across the Joint, Inter-Agency and Multinational (JIM) domains as a key Programme Benefit and core principle, as well as under-pinning several of the programme’s principal Investment Objectives.  The task of developing an Interoperability Strategy and measurement framework for the NEA Programme is undertaken by Systematic NZ, in their NEA Programme System Design role.

This session examines the roadmap of Interoperability measurement frameworks and models, extrapolates a number of key features from several of them, and proposes a generic maturity model for tracking the progress of acquisition systems towards achieving the full benefits commanded in an Acquisition business case.  The NZDF NEA Programme is explored as a case study, with potential parallels in Australia.

 

2.7c Update: Employing Wireless to Achieve Manoeuvre and Secure Mobility

 

Presenters: Mr Kristian Howard; Director, Products & Capability; Penten

 

Technology has disabled manoeuvre and static deployed forces face a higher threat risk. Field headquarters typically use cabled infrastructure: secure, but expensive and cumbersome to roll out, restricting the mobility and tempo of deployed forces. Wireless connectivity can be rapidly deployed and allows devices to remain entirely mobile within signal range. The primary reason commercial wireless solutions are not used, however, is the absence of appropriate security.

 

During Ex HAMEL 2018 the Land Network Integration Centre (LNIC) led a trial to employ wireless technology to deliver secure mobility to the Deployed Joint Force Headquarters (DJFHQ).

 

This update, presented by LNIC and Penten, discusses the objectives of the trial, the collaboration between Defence and an Industry partner to deliver technology innovation, lessons learned and key requirements for future phases of development. Particular attention will be given to challenges of accreditation, integration and the user experience.

 

2.8a Update: Defence Sector CIS Workforce—Supply & Demand

 

Presenter:  Mr Robert Kremer; Director; Kinexus

 

With $195 billion being invested in defence capability over the next decade, the defence sector will be required to grow significantly. The sector has been growing steadily since 2016, and is poised to add a further 2,000 new positions in the next 12-18 months. Constrained access to workers contributed to the project delays experienced in the late 2000’s, and if not carefully managed now, may do so again. Kinexus’ recently released its fourth Defence Insights report, containing comprehensive data relating to industry demand, salary levels, worker demographics and attraction and retention factors. Insights have been drawn from proprietary tools and systems, as well as from unique access to senior leaders and planners in the sector.  The below data and insights will be reviewed and analysed, with a focus on CIS projects and workforce.

 

Project Environment

       The current defence sector project environment, along with analysis on the impact of adjacent industry activity.

       Worker Demand

       First ever defence sector job vacancy index by location and employment type.

       Predicted hiring activity in the defence sector in the next 18 months. Broken down by state.

       Most in-demand CIS related skills sets.

Salaries & Expectations

       2018 salary survey data by skill sets and locations.

       Factors that will enhance organisation’s ability to attract and retain essential talent.

Supply Solutions

       How to make the most efficient use of existing workers.

       How to grow the pool of potential workers, including existing, planned and possible initiatives.

 

Skilled workers are a fundamental input to capability for industry and government, and now is the time to reduce the risk of undersupply.

 

2.8b Update:  Benefits of Partnering for Managed Cyber Services

 

Presenter:  Mr Phil Mar; CTO – IA and Cybersecurity; Viasat

 

Internet Service Providers have to develop an integrated cybersecurity systems and strategy to combat the adversary as the mainstay for our business case for reliable service. The same technology can be used to protect systems beyond transport networks. In this presentation, Viasat discusses key approach and measure on how to defend our systems through the use of continuous monitoring, big data analytics, behavior analysis , custom threat intelligence, machine learning and SOC operations, as well as the latest threat from IoT that threaten the users and our ISP network. Government should considering partnering with ISP for managed cyber services. Viasat will present two use cases. The first use case is how executive aircrafts are being protected from cyber-attack with ISP Managed Cybersecurity Service. The second is how Gov’t or Enterprise can benefit with classified threat intelligence without expensive startup cost-based on Trusted Cyber Sensors (TCS) Technology. Viasat is an internet broadband service provider by satellites that serves more than 900,000 customers worldwide on land, sea and over the air. Our customers range from Consumer, Enterprise, Government and Military.

 

2.8c Update: Crypto-modernization

 

Presenter:  Mr Phil Mar; CTO – IA and Cybersecurity; Viasat

 

Two major paradigm shifts are occurring in the world of High Grade (Type 1) crypto technology and cybersecurity in tactical network. First, for many years, IP layer crypto has been the only option for Warfighters and theirs supporting Enterprise. With the new Ethernet Type 1 Standard, new options for tactical environment to cloud can transform battlefield communications. Secondly, with Trusted Cyber Sensor (TCS) technology, classified threat Intel can be extended to protect those in the tactical edge. In this presentation, Viasat will describe those technologies and how it can provide full connectivity and situation awareness for the warfighters, and allow ISR missions integrated with cyber electromagnetic activities (CEMA).

.

2.9a Product Brief: Using SharePoint to Support C2

 

Presenter:  Mr Perry Smith; Managing Director; Myriad Technologies

 

SharePoint is a powerful and flexible platform, but when it comes to supporting the warfighter, it lacks a number of features that are required to properly support C2. This includes information replication and federation, support for information classification and releaseability, and a number of other key areas. In this session, we explore enhancements to SharePoint that enable the platform to properly and fully support the warfighter in a variety of operating contexts, including land and sea.

 

2.9b Tutorial:  Interagency Collaboration in a Cyber-secure Way

 

Presenter:  Mr Perry Smith; Managing Director; Myriad Technologies

 

We live in a less safe world today than we did five years ago. It is not being paranoid about someone trying to steal your information if you actually know it is true.

 

If the past few years have taught us anything, it is that information can be stolen in a variety of unexpected and innovative ways.

 

The traditional response is to double down on emails that are encrypted, or, for some, paper remains a viable way of communicating. There is a better way! In this session you will discover a variety of ways to secure your information that make it all but impossible for someone to steal that information. Collaborating in a new cyber secure way across domain boundaries will become the norm, but for now, it is still considered leading edge. In this session we explore how to achieve that with today's tooling and techniques!

 

2.9c Product Brief: S2IX—Information Appliance

 

Presenter:  Mr Perry Smith; Managing Director; Myriad Technologies

 

Secure search simplified!

 

In a nutshell, Secure Search and Information Exchange (S2IX) is an enterprise grade appliance allowing organisations like Defence to solve a range of repeatable business processes consistently across the organisation. S2IX takes repeatable business processes to the next level, by recognising repeatable patterns of business activities. These business activities can look like:

       Warfighter services (SITREP, CUBS, RFI’s etc)

       Project management collaboration environments

       Communities of interest and communities of practice

       Investigations and operations

       Intranet and presentation services

 

Users of this service can be at any point in the network (PIN). The service and appliance can scale from a vehicle, truck or ship all the way through to whole of organisation. 

 

Information is seamlessly replicated across the organization, providing simple and easy records and compliance to Australian and international standards.

 

S2IX fully supports cloud implementations and is available through the ASD accredited Canberra protected Data Centre to protected level. S2IX is also available at secret and above level through on-premise hardware or through Cloud on-premise technologies like Azure stack. This means that the same consistent implementation is available regardless of environment and PIN of the users.

 

Imagine being able to implement a solution like an embarked force mission planning and mission support template in a week, rather than a year. That same solution could provide on ship access to information that has not been seen since collaboration at sea was built and developed by the coalition forces in Lotus notes.  This session will demonstrate this, through the power and capability of S2IX.

.

2.10a Product Brief: Software-defined Cybersecurity Fabric for Dynamic, Scale-out and Cost-optimised Threat Defense

 

Presenter:  Mr Prashant Gandhi; VP and Chief Product Officer, Big Switch

 

Threat defense is lagging far behind the fast-growing surface of cyber-attacks.  This is because traditional cyber-security architecture is fragmented across several components, including:

            network

            packet/flow services

            analytics

            tools. 

 

Distributed policy decision/enforcement points (PDPs/PEPs) are silo’d across application environments (in data center), user environments (in branch/campus), DMZ inline and out-of-band (Tap/SPAN) aggregation.  Furthermore, box-by-box operational models have made cyber-security architecture incredibly complex, slow to react to attacks and expensive to innovate.

 

This session proposes a software-defined, loosely-coupled cyber-security architecture to make it highly dynamic to a fast-changing threat landscape - respond rapidly to detect and defend against complex attacks and leverage scale-out commodity hardware to optimise cost while ensuring flexibility.  Architecture of the above-mentioned components will be described along with their inter-dependencies to stand-up an end-to-end software-defined cybersecurity fabric (SDSec). 

 

An existence proof-point of such an architecture will also be provided, leveraging software-defined networking, software-defined monitoring, software-defined service chaining, software-defined security tools and software-defined analytics/packet capture. All operate on cost-optimised open networking hardware and x86 servers in order to provide scale-out threat defense at multi-gigabit to multi-terabit speeds.  Programmatic interactions across SDSec will be demonstrated for dynamic and scalable threat defense.

 

2.10b Update: No Matter How Big or How Small – Guard Your Data from Exfiltration and Misadventure

 

Presenter:  Mr George Kamis; Chief Technology Officer, Global Governments & Critical Infrastructure; Forcepoint

 

All missions generate and store vast amounts of data. Data takes many forms and is driven by large computing systems, administrative systems and individual users performing day-to-day operations. In the course of a day data is stored, accessed and shared often multiple times – from mobile devices, laptops, cloud services and apps to email and instant message – tracking and preventing exfiltration, leakage and misadventure becomes daunting.

 

Understanding data, what is important, managing and governing access grows exponentially complex. Is the data used as intended? Is it shared appropriately? Has it been compromised? Is it residing within the correct classification level?

The one constant in complexity is the people who interact with data, systems and devices. Rather than trying to track all devices, bits and bytes and millions of events, a human-centric approach to cybersecurity provides the necessary visibility into how users interact with data and, most importantly, the context to understand user intent. This context helps quickly identify – hours vs years – when imposters have infiltrated your network.

 

Mitigating the risk of sensitive data loss – through exfiltration or misadventure – is accomplished through strong data loss prevention policies and techniques. Effectively utilizing contextual data provides the means to dynamically adapt countermeasures in cloud, on devices and across systems. This risk-adaptive approach safeguards data based on users’ calculated behavioral risk level and data value.

 

During this session, attendees will learn techniques to create a flexible, scalable, intelligent, efficient, secure framework through human-centric analytics to reduce data breaches and the volume of false positives.

 

2.10c Update: "Raising the Bar:" Forcepoint's Experiences in the New Paradigm

 

Presenter:  Mr George Kamis; Chief Technology Officer, Global Governments & Critical Infrastructure; Forcepoint

 

George Kamis, Forcepoint Global Governments & Critical Infrastructure Chief Technology Officer, will discuss how the Raise-The-Bar initiatives for cross domain solutions are enabling government and military IT modernization throughout the Five-Eyes nations. He will also discuss the importance of building solid public-private sector partnerships with government and technology partners continues to be crucial in ensuring that we deliver technology with the most robust security and usability possible, while supporting our customers' current and future mission requirements. For more than 20 years, Forcepoint has delivered commercial cross domain solutions that enable secure practices while also streamlining efficient and secure access to, and transfer of, mission-critical information.

 


Session Abstracts: Day 3 - 15 November 2018

 

3.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: An Introduction to Comtech’s Assured Communications Satellite Products

 

Presenter:  Mr Price D'Antonio; Vice President Government Programs; Comtech EF Data

 

Comtech Telecommunications Corporation (CMTL) develops and provides secure advanced communications products for Commercial and Government markets.  These technologies and products include Satellite-based Communications, Public Safety & Next Generation 9-1-1 applications, Enterprise & trusted location platforms, Command & Control (C4ISR) Solutions, and Cybersecurity training and applications. This Product Briefing will highlight our Assured Communications satellite products.  The briefing will include products from three divisions within CMTL: Comtech EF Data, Comtech Systems Integration, and Comtech Command & Control Technologies.  From Comtech EF Data is product information on our SLM-5650B, SLM-5650C, DMD-2050E, DMD-1050TS advanced satellite modems, and on the Advanced TDMA Interface Processor (ATIP).  These products are currently meeting critical US Government needs for high performance and assured communications in contested environments. From Comtech Systems Integration this briefing will focus on our Troposcatter Systems which provide long range assured communications at very high data rates.  From Comtech Command & Control Technologies we will present product descriptions for two critical C4ISR products, our highly modular and small Ultra Satellite Terminal, and our Blue Force Tracking (BFT) transceiver which provides critical tracking capabilities to our Blue Forces.

 

3.2 Plenary Session: Defence Cyber

 

Keynote Address: On One Page AVM Warren McDonald, Chief Joint Capabilities

Keynote Address: MAJGEN Marcus Thompson, Head Information Warfare

 

3.3a Expo Session: Modernising Mission-critical Applications in the Australian Microsoft Azure Government Cloud

 

Presenter:  Mr James Kavanagh; Microsoft Azure Engineering Lead, Australia & New Zealand, Microsoft

 

This talk will outline an approach to the modernisation of applications making use of Microsoft Azure as a hybrid cloud platform that consistently extends from protected to top-secret data.  From scenarios for the tactical deployed edge (including data collection, remote processing and inference) through to centralised cloud architecture (for large-scale computers, data analysis and model training), this presentation will illustrate the primary architectural patterns and considerations for use of the Australian Microsoft Azure Government regions in Canberra.

 

James is the senior engineering leader in the Microsoft Azure Global Ecosystem team, responsible for the success of Microsoft Azure in the existing Azure regions (Australia East, Australia Southeast) and the new Azure regions (Australia Central 1 and 2).  He is focused on ensuring Microsoft Azure continues to deliver the best and most trusted hyperscale cloud platform for local customers and partners in all sectors. James joined Microsoft in 2004 and has held roles in solution architecture, sales and technology strategy.

 

3.3b Update: JP 9111 – Joint Command and Control

 

Presenter:  Mr Jody Whymark; CASG & WGCDR Michael Burgess-Orton, Joint Capabilities Group

 

JP 9111 – Joint Command and Control will provide applications, tools and systems enabling ADF Commanders and their staff to make quality, timely decisions across all levels of Joint Command. JP9111 Tranche 1 will provide improvements across all aspects of Joint Command and Control, but will prioritise enhanced visualisation, targeting and battlespace communication capabilities for the ADF. JP 9111 plans to utilise modern continuous delivery methodologies to deliver capability in a fast and agile manner across ADF systems, platforms and environments.

 

3.3c Lunch Session Product Brief: Leveraging Cloud-based Technologies to Enhance Mission Critical Capabilities for Defence Forces

Presenter:  Mr James Kavanagh & Mr Andrew-Thomas Ball; Microsoft Australia

 

This presentation examines technology challenges and innovation based on working with many international organisations responsible for public safety and national security. The presentation will discuss how to bring cutting-edge solutions to evolving Defence mission critical needs, particularly in the areas of cyber security, communications and electronic and information warfare.

 

3.3d Update JP 9347 – Joint Data Networks

 

Presenter: COL Tony Ross and Mr David Miller; CASG & COL Daniel Hartigan, Joint Capabilities Group

 

JP9347-1 Multi Tactical Data Link Network Sub-Program will deliver the ADF’s Joint Data network capabilities that will contribute to achieving a better integrated Joint Force. This clarity enables planning to evolve the ADF’s data network capabilities as new systems are introduced and as Fifth generation platforms transition into Service. Further development of the Multi Tactical Data Link Network Sub-Program is aimed at providing ADF support and protection to allied forces. The program will modernise and better support the ADF’s communication between units and provide commanders with greater situational awareness when managing key operations.

 

3.3e Update: JP 2221 – Multinational Information Sharing and JP2060 – Deployable Medical Capability

 

Presenter: Mr Basil Dewhurst; CASG & WGCDR Michael Burgess-Orton & replace with Mr Jim Walker, Joint Capabilities Group

 

JP 2221 - Defence’s multi national information sharing capability is critical to enabling Government’s expectation for Australia to be ‘regional security partner of choice’.  Investment in Defence’s multi national information sharing capability is critical to enabling Australia to have the wherewithal to either lead or join a regional coalition, in a diverse range of circumstances from Humanitarian and Disaster Relief through to Drug Enforcement and prevention of Maritime People Smuggling.

 

JP 2060 - Deployable Medical Capability is a multi-phase Joint Project providing equipment and systems that will enhance an ADF-wide deployable health capability comprising capabilities to prevent, treat and evacuate casualties in joint operations in the defence of Australia and its interests within each of the Services.

 

3.3f Update: LAND 200: Digital Evolution of Land Forces Command and Control

 

Presenter:  COL Mick Toohey; Director Land C3, CASG and Colonel Joanne Whittaker; AHQ

 

This presentation will update industry on progress of the Army LAND 200 Battlefield Command System program and future Tranche 3 requirements.

 

LAND 200 is at the heart of Army’s military digital evolution for the 21st century and has been delivering the Battlefield Command System capability into Defence since 2011. This capability provides Army with tactical digital radios and an integrated Battle Management System that is transforming command and control of Land forces from a paper-based system to a modern digital system.

 

LAND 200 will improve the Australian Defence Force’s interoperability with Joint, Allied and Coalition forces. With Tranche 1 complete and Tranche 2 currently being delivered, Defence is looking to the future at Tranche 3 and what will be required to complete the digitalisation of the Land force.

 

3.4a Secure Summit Canberra

 

Today’s Attitudes, Tomorrow’s Opportunities - Trends in the Cybersecurity Workforce

Presenter: Mr Tony Vizza, Director, Cybersecurity Advocacy, Asia-Pacific, (ISC)2

 

Cyber-Enabled Information and Influence Warfare and Manipulation: Detection and Response

Presenter: Professor Jill Slay; Optus La Trobe Chair Cyber Security, Latrobe University

 

3.4b Secure Summit Canberra

 

Security at the Speed of the Network

Presenter: Mr Ian Farquhar; Distinguished Sales Engineer, WW Security Subject Matter Expert, Gigamon

 

 

3.4d Secure Summit Canberra

 

Demystifying Cyber Insurance

Presenter: Mr Andrew Taylor, Cyber Underwriting Manager Asia Pacific, Chubb Insurance Australia

 

In this session, Andrew will talk about cyber insurance development, talk to claims trends and answer questions on how the product can assist mitigate the costs of a network breach and assist insured’s recover from cyber attacks.

 

Incident Response Communications—Feeding Chips to Seagulls

Presenter: Mr Craig Searle; Chief Apiarist, Hivint

The increasing prevalence of cyber incidents and data breaches worldwide has resulted in a growing awareness in boardrooms across Australia of the necessity to have a well-established incident response plan. A critical component of any response plan is how the incident itself and the organisation’s response will be communicated internally and to the broader public. This presentation will identify not only the key components in establishing an effective incident response and data breach communications framework, but also the implications of the recently-enacted mandatory disclosure legislation.

 

 


3.4e Secure Summit Canberra

 

The Critical Factors For Deploying Your Secure SD-WAN

Presenter: Mr Jack Chan; Fortinet

 

Supply Chain Insecurity

Presenter: Mr Nick Savvides; Chief Technology Officer, Symantec

Supply chain attacks have always been a concern, but in today’s world can we truly know the provenance and authenticity of the complicated hardware and software componentry in our systems? This talk examines the complexities, commercial aspects and the practicality conducting and detecting of supply chain attacks.

 

3.4f Secure Summit Canberra

 

Australia’s Cyber Security Workforce: What The Bleep Do We Know?

Presenter: Mr Byron Nagy; AustCyber - the Australian Cyber Security Growth Network Ltd

 

3.5a Update: Miniaturization of Link 16 Radios and Impacts to Operational Networks

 

Presenter:  Mr Mike Kocin; Director of International Programs; Viasat

 

Discussion of new technologic advances in Link 16 Products to include the deployment and implementation of Hand Held Radio applications. The presentation will discuss technology advances in hardware and software capabilities, platform implementation and integration issues and overall concept of operations changes based on these new participating units. This includes a roadmap of miniaturization from the Days of JTIDS Class 1 and 2 to miniaturized Link 16 technology.

 

This technology improvement allows additional personnel and platforms to participate in net centric warfare with applications ranging from very small UAVs to forward observers and air controllers. The addition of these participants will change how information is shared on the battlefield and how networks must be designed in order to accommodate the new participants.

 

3.5b Product Brief: What Determines the Data Rate? A Technical Introduction to Radio Communications

 

Presenter: Dr Rowan Gilmore; Managing Director; EM Solutions

 

The data throughput is one of the end-user’s most important performance parameters for a communications link. This tutorial systematically explores the trade-offs between distance, power, antenna size, frequency, bandwidth, and modulation complexity and shows their impact on the data rate that can be achieved.

 

Shannon’s equation is a simple equation relating bandwidth, power, and noise to system capacity, and is a good starting point. The link budget equation can then be added to provide a high-level picture showing the effect of distance and antenna gain on the receiver threshold and transmitter capability. Using both, the concept of fade margin can be developed and related to further choices in modulation and bandwidth, so that the data rate and associated error rate can then be determined.

 

Comparisons between terrestrial and satellite communications are used to illustrate the key principles. Finally, typical commercial radio system architectures for both terrestrial and satellite terminals are shown and simulated to illustrate how system imperfections, such as linearity and noise, can degrade the bit error rate and link performance, and to show why poorly designed systems are more susceptible to jamming signals and interference than others.

 

The tutorial is a technical refresher for communications engineers, field personnel, and procurement and project managers

 

3.5d Tutorial: Flexible Modem Interface—Enabling Network Solutions for Multi-Service Provider Roaming across the Wideband SATCOM Enterprise

 

Presenter:  Mr Kevin Zhang; Supinf-Technologies

 

Today, rapid business and technology innovations are producing an array of advanced commercial satellite communications (COMSATCOM) systems that can deliver massive amounts of SATCOM capacity at a fraction of current cost and offer communications diversity that is critical for achieving resilience in a military contested environment. Recognizing the alignment of commercial capabilities with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) requirements for high capacity, global coverage, lower cost, and resilience, the department is proactively engaging the industry to formulate strategies leading towards a DoD Wideband SATCOM Enterprise that efficiently acquires and effectively manages advanced commercial capabilities in its architecture. To fully leverage the expanded space resources, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) must also address the integration of commercial capabilities into their own Wideband SATCOM Enterprise. The terminal flexibility for operating across multiple operator networks, in multiple frequency bands, and support different waveforms/modems is not only a pre-requisite for accessing advanced services but also key in providing resilience against threats. The ability for a tactical terminal to dynamically roam among different service providers’ networks, and between the ADF and commercial systems is a potential “killer app” for future ADF Wideband SATCOM enterprises. Dubbed Multi-Service Provider roaming, this capability supports flexible, adaptive, and potentially optimized usage of SATCOM resources in support of ADF missions.

 

The purpose of this paper is to provide an architectural overview of the flexible terminal and Flexible Modem Interface (FMI) concepts. The FMI enables managed terminal flexibility and should be considered as an important step in converging tactical terminal segment capabilities for various types of satellite networks and managed services. Additionally, we introduce an enterprise construct that can integrate and manage SATCOM capability comprised of both commercial and military systems. The ground system implications and network solutions pertaining to Multi-Service Provider roaming are also discussed. Lastly, we present enabling technologies that enhance network flexibility and identify open problem areas for future capability development.

 

3.5e Update: One Loose Cable: Why the 5th Generation Army Needs a Corps of Combat Communicators

 

Presenter:  Sergeant Richard Morgan; 31/42 RQR

 

This presentation seeks to answer the question: Is there a need for specialist communicators that support commanders at the tactical unit level (Battle Group and below). To answer this question, I researched legacy regimental communications courses and post modernisation/digitisation courses.

 

The presentation is based on my experiences as an instructor at the School of Armour – Communications and Surveillance Wing and my experiences teaching the Advanced Combat Communicators Course. I noticed, with the trainees, that there was a lack of modernisation occurring and that unfortunately, the Australian Army was about five years behind where it should have been in the implementation of communications training.

 

Broadly, the first section discusses the complexity of the modern, digitised radio systems, as opposed to the legacy radio systems. It mentions how quickly the systems are evolving and the associated skill fade of the current practices. I found that this has been hampered by insufficient and outdated technical doctrine and that training courses have been an afterthought.

 

Additionally, the presentation explores the difference between Signallers and Communicators, and what each specialist provides for strategic and the regimental communications (Battle Group and below). The text also explores patchwork communicators and whole the practice of training regimental communicators is failing and how, with improvement, could lead to greater capacity and improve the ADF’s effectiveness.

 

It is hoped that this presentation will inform commanders and leaders of the current issues facing regimental communications within the Australian Army and ways it can be addressed in the future.

 

3.6a Product Brief: Beyond Classified Platforms - Enabling Australia’s “Smart Defence” Future

 

Presenter:  Mr Scott Wilkie; AUCloud

 

As the former international advisor to the UK’s leading government and defence cloud, Scott Wilkie and founding team have incorporated the many architectural and functional learnings into AUCloud - how to design, build and manage sovereign digital infrastructure across multiple classifications to enable defence projects, integrate and secure the supply chain and foster innovation in a manner that neither traditional or hyperscale infrastructure and processes will support. In this presentation, Scott will meld lessons from the 5Eyes Partners into an Australian vision and capability for sovereign projects like the frigate, submarine and JSF programs which require functionality for multiple stakeholders across multiple domains. Features such as quantum encryption, cross domain data transfers, aggregation and analytics combined with encrypted search will accelerate innovation while significantly reducing cost and risk. This session will provide key learnings to assist in determining how secure information platforms should be architected and delivered for the “Smart Defence” future.

 

3.6b Product Brief: Joint Force C4ISREW with SitaWare

 

Presenter:  Mr Morten Tolbøl; Senior Sales Engineer, Systematic

 

SitaWare is now the leading C2 solution in the Allied and NATO communities.  Emerging from its heritage in the Land environment, SitaWare is now also deployed around the world in the Maritime, Joint, Air, EW, and Emergency Services domains.  Come and see why SitaWare is such a hot commodity and how it could help you bridge the gap.

 

3.6d Update: Australian Generic Vehicle Architecture (GVA) Update

 

Presenter:  MAJ Michael Dawson, ASGVA Office, AHQ

 

The Australian Army has adopted the Australian Generic Vehicle Architecture as its vehicle integration standard. This will enable Army to procure and sustain vehicle platforms that are integrated, adaptable to operational circumstance and affordable. Defining vehicle integration standards comes with a governance imperative. In particular, the Australian Land Data Model will require close management to realise benefits of integrating a single sub-system across multiple platforms. This presentation will summarise the Generic Vehicle Architecture, provide an update on its Australian implementation and highlight the planned approach to AS LDM governance to ensure it enables integration, whilst not hindering innovation or slowing development of new capabilities. The presentation will also provide an update on future Army vehicle integration plans.

 

3.6e Update: System-to-system Formatted Communication

 

Presenter:  Mr Kristoffer Davis Foldbjerg, IRIS Product Manager, Systematic

 

This session is for any project building or supporting a system that needs to exchange information with other systems: C2, Health, Logistics, EW, etc.  It is especially relevant for Joint and Coalition operations.

 

Kristoffer will explore how to support ADF Information Exchange Requirements (IER) using XML Message Text Format (MTF) that the ADF has already deployed. It covers how projects can save time, effort and risk by using IRIS; recent product updates; future roadmap; and an opportunity for feedback directly to the product manager collaboratively with Australian projects and the ADF TDL Authority (ADFTA) to ensure IRIS continues to meet the needs of the ADF.

 

About IRIS: Used across the ADF for machine-to-machine and human-readable structured messages, IRIS is also integrated with Outlook in some systems to provide Military Messaging, and manages the Australian MTF (ASMTF) standard, It is administered by ADFTA.

 


3.6f Update: Smart Integration – Simple on the Other Side of Complex

 

Presenter:  Mr David Abel; Director, LUMINACT

 

 

Many would claim to be expert at integrating a system onto a platform but what about integration with the platform. As technology continues to advance and defence employ more open architectures there is a growing need to look at how we integrate. The aim has always been to maximise the effectiveness of the capability to platform user. Our historical approach to semi-stove pipe procurement has meant that this has not always been the case. Through Smart Integration we can claw back previously missed capability giving greater versatility!

 

3.7a Product Brief:  Towards Accelerated Warfare: Generating Military Power Through a More Agile and Integrated C4ISR Architecture

 

Presenter:  Mr Guy Reeve; Account Executive, MarkLogic & Mr James Gibson; Enterprise Architect, Fujitsu Australia

 

This paper argues that achieving the vision of accelerated warfare requires proactive ‘agency advantage’ rather than an ‘information advantage’ approach to Joint Command and Control (C2) architectures and C4ISR solutions.  In effect, this extends the focus from systems to include an overarching C4ISR ‘fabric’ with pervasive integration and interaction with C4ISR systems in and across all domains. This new paradigm is needed to untangle the increasing complexity resulting from proliferation and diversity of new and legacy sensors and systems as they interoperate to process, exploit and use mission data in real time; and to enable continued evolution of more modular and agile systems with the goal of faster innovation. To implement this approach requires us to introduce the concepts of Smart Nodes and Smart Networks as the integrating ‘fabric’ helping the ADF generate agency advantage and leading to improved military power in deployed operations. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is then validated against the interoperability use case and recommendations provided.

 

3.7b Update: Security Implications of Digitally Transforming your Operations

 

Presenter:  Mr Mark Palmer; CTO, Ocean Software

 

Digital transformation is becoming the norm for organisations today, and even defence and security organisations are rushing to digitally transform their operations. However the security implications of this are huge. Air gapping your network is not the answer either practically or securely, encrypting of data can give you a false sense of protection. With the advent of Big Data Analysis and Micro Data Trend analysis, sensitive operational data such as Shift Change Times, Base Staffing Levels or even staff movement can be obtained from non-secured data such as System Logs or even simply Network Traffic. For example, the position of military base operations have been compromised due to defence personnel sharing exercise data through fitness applications. The same principles can be used to obtain far more data when targeted analysis is performed. When digitally transforming your operations, some basic simple principles can be applied to limit or reduce the ability to gather information on your operational capability and operations.

 

3.7d Update: Employing Cyber Deception to Detect and Track Sophisticated Adversaries

 

Presenter:  Mr Ben Whitham, Penten

 

The application of deception has been a tenet of military operations for thousands of years. It has been demonstrated to reduce casualties and achieve surprise by tricking the adversary into concentrating forces in the wrong location, wasting time effort and munitions, and disregarding real intelligence successes.

 

Deception offers similar potential to turn the tables on adversaries and obfuscate data and systems in the cyber domain. It also has the added benefit of producing high fidelity intrusion and insider threat detection that, unlike traditional systems, does not contribute to alert fatigue. It is for these reasons that Gartner has identified cyber deception as one of the hot emerging technologies to protect data and systems.

 

This update will provide an introduction level overview to the tools and tactics that are starting to be used in commercial environments to hunt and track cyber adversaries. The talk will include an extract of some of the material and demonstrations taught on the UNSW Canberra Cyber Professional Education short courses of how to hide data, and create enticing fakes using simple tools that can be applied to any network, including tactical deployments.

 

3.7e Update: Defence Spectrum Update

 

Presenter:  Mr David Murray; Department of Defence

 

This presentation will provide an update on developments concerning spectrum within Defence and the wider spectrum community. This will include progress on the Government spectrum review, tracking technology topics (such as 5G) and a summary of regulatory topics (such as agenda items for the ITU World Radio Conference 2019).

 

3.7f Update: JNT9101-1 Project PHOENIX—The Enhanced Defence High Frequency Communications System

 

Presenter:  Mr Steve Wright; Department of Defence

 

Over recent years the ADF, among the rest of the world, has become reliant on high bandwidth, constant connection, Internet Protocol (IP) information over satellite bearers. But what happens if that satellite system is compromised in some way or destroyed? The failure of secure satellite communications systems would leave soldiers, sailors and airmen and women cut off from their commanders and more vulnerable to attack.

 

The Government is placing increasingly more importance on cyber security—this risk is real—if satellite communications are disrupted or denied, how will the ADF communicate between Australian and deployed assets?

 

--- PROJECT PHOENIX IS COMING ---

 

The ADF’s High Frequency Communications System is already world leading but, like all good things, must continue to improve. The increased threat to operational effectiveness posed by satellite-denied, degraded, intermittent or low bandwidth environments has driven research into enhanced high frequency communications capabilities.

 

Project Phoenix aims to capitalise on this research by enhancing the Defence HF Communications System (EDHFCS) with the result that:

•     The EDHFCS will offer world-wide reliable communications.

•     The EDHFCS will provide persistent and resilient communications.

•     The EDHFCS will be designed, developed and built in Australia - sovereign owned and operated

 

Want to know more? Come and talk with us.

 

3.8a Update: Network Performance and Security Management in Today’s Defence Environments

 

Presenter: Dr Rajiv Shah; Country Director, Cybersecurity Business Unit, Net Consulting

 

Today’s networks are becoming larger and more complex, as organisations take advantage of the benefits of interconnectivity and cloud migration. In this environment it is vital to still be able effectively model networks, forecast capacity and demand, and manage performance. Alongside this is the challenge of implementing operational security in a changing environment. The nature of military and defence networks means that they may face different threats from public networks, but nonetheless very real ones. Whilst some network performance solutions can help in identifying security risks and in real-time monitoring, they typically need to be supplemented with analytics and threat intelligence in order to allow network operators to be provided with prioritised, timely advice, rather than being lost in a deluge of alerts and advisories.

 

This talk will discuss:

•           Overview of modern network environments and trends

•           Approaches to modelling and visualising complex, hybrid networks

•           Network performance modelling and management

•           The threat environment for military and defence networks

•           Effective risk and vulnerability assessment approaches

•           Real time monitoring, especially for insider threats

•           Opportunities that secure cloud provides for more effective managed security

•           Lessons learnt from Net Consulting’s experience with MOD in the UK

 


3.8d Update: Towards Automatic Implementation of TDL Systems

 

Presenter: Prof. Dr. Eggendorfer Tobias; Universität der Bundeswehr München

 

At MilCIS 2016 we provided a paper in the academic track which demonstrated the status of a prototype being able to automatically configure TDL-systems based on XMLized TDL-standards. The research in this area has since continued and we therefore would like to update the MilCIS audience on our work. Being active participants in the NATO TDLXML Syndicate we would also like to report on the continuing effort there to provide a machine readable, XMLized version of the STANAG, which has been ratified by NATO in a first version.

 

Contrary to many other ideas of using XML in TDL, NATO TDLXMLS’ intention is to provide a full XML specification of the NATO standard STANAG 5516 (Link 16) and subsequently of other military standards such as Link 11, NILE, VMF, ADatP3 etc. There is currently some research by other parties trying to transmit messages in XML both over the air or wired networks, which from our very technical point of view is in massive contrast to the heavy bandwidth restrictions TDL networks have to deal with.

 

NATO TDLXMLS therefore intends to have the STANAG itself being an XML document. Thereby the current rather tedious processing of PDF and / or Word documents is avoided, ambiguity and / or mistakes because of manual updates to the documents as well. By using a standardized XML representation, the document could be fully automatically created and change requests could be incorporated automatically as well. This is seen as the major advantage of using a machine readable format, such as XML, over a human readable format such as Word for describing the STANAG by the TDLXMLS.

 

We intend to go that one step further: Instead of only providing the standard in a machine readable format and rendering it to a human readable format for implementation, we suggest to build TDL devices able to read the XMLized STANAG and automatically configure accordingly. This is what we presented in 2016.

 

Our update would include some findings on standard compliance in TDL device implementation which we found to be - frankly - poor. This is mostly correlated to standards being ambiguous due to human readability and the complexity of the standards. However this poor implementation requires complex processes to provide for systems being built by different manufacturers to be able to interoperate in the theatre. An example for this costly processes is „iSmart“ or „eSmart“, both document - among others - standard deviations by devices.

 

We also found that most TDL systems do not implement the full standard most likely for economical purposes but rather restrict themselves to a subset that is appropriate for the respective use-case. This is very reasonable, however in interoperability it defeats to purpose of a standard.

 

Besides these standardization approaches, there are news from NATO in terms of adopting the XML specification of TDLs such as Link 16 as a NATO wide standard.

 

We will also report on aligning the XMLized STANAG on NATOs STF-3 definition.

 

3.8e Update: Faster Data Integration for a More Agile ADF

 

Presenter:  Mr Guy Reeve; Account Executive, MarkLogic & Mr James Gibson; Enterprise Architect, Fujitsu Australia

 

This paper argues that in the face of increasing diversity and complexity in sensors and systems, and thus proliferation of silos of associated data, a new approach to data integration and interoperability, and a new ‘intelligent node’ approach to distributing mission data, is required by the Australian Defence Force (ADF) if it is to retain its information edge in deployed operations. The paper:

            identifies the key modernisation challenge and capability limitation facing the ADF is that, notwithstanding the move towards open standards, the increasing diversity and velocity of data, and the impact of standards-based approaches on interoperability are likely to inhibit the ADF’s ability to incorporate technology innovations at the rate necessary to stay ahead of existing and future threats;

            explores the irony of why standards-based approaches are likely to inhibit the ADF’s ability to evolve its systems with sufficient agility and to rapidly share information securely across both the joint force and with its multinational partners;

            proposes a ‘multi-model’ conceptual and technical approach to ensure much more rapid integration and fusion of data from both existing and new systems into its digitised and networked force. The proposed approach aims to complement and augment, rather than replace existing standards-based approaches to data integration, collapse ‘silos’ of data and afford more flexibility and agility in the evolution of a ‘system of systems’; and

            suggests a novel architectural approach - a Collaborative Adaptive Mission Network (CAMNet) - to improve information logistics for deployed forces, based on an ‘intelligent node’ fabric in which deployed nodes are able to capture, process and flexibly replicate the right data to the right place at the right time.